Analysis of Life Cycle of Ibm

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  • Topic: IBM, Tabulating machine, Corporation
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ASSIGNMENT (Group) - 2010
Analysis of Life-Cycle of IBM

OCTOBER 23, 2010
IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE
"ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR - II"
OF MBA (FULL TIME)
SUBMITTED TO:
Prof. Harismita Trivedi and Prof. Sari Mattila
Submitted By:
Group No. 43
Saurabh Shrivastava – 101143
Rohit Adukia – 101243
Roshni Kumar – 101343

Table of Contents

1.CURRENT SCENARIO1
2.HISTORY OF IBM2
2.1The Origin of IBM2
2.2IBM’s Early Growth4
2.3IBM post World War II and rise of business computing5
2.4IBM’s near disaster6
2.5IBM’s Resurrection and Organizational Culture8
3.LEARNINGS FROM THE COURSE AND HOW WE CAN USE IT AS A MANAGER10
4.EXHIBITS13
5.ARTICLE:14
6.BIBLIOGRAPHY15

1.
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5. CURRENT SCENARIO
IBM, International Business Machines which was founded on June 16, 1911 in Endicott, New York, U.S, is today a Public Limited Company listed on the New York Stock Exchange. It employees approximately 400,000 employees worldwide with sales of greater than 100 billion US dollars. Mr. Samuel J. Palmisano is the current Chairman, President and CEO and Mr. Mark Loughridge, the SVP and CFO of the company. It owns subsidiaries like ADSTAR, Lotus Software, ILOG etc.. IBM is working with its clients to develop new business designs and technical architectures that allow their businesses the flexibility required to compete in the global business landscape. The business is also adjusting its footprint toward emerging geographies, tapping their double-digit growth, providing the technology infrastructure they need, and taking advantage of the talent pools they provide to better service the company’s clients. However, let's also clear up what IBM is not doing. IBM is no longer selling personal computers. In fact, IBM sold its PC division to Lenovo in 2005. Technology is still a big part of their mission, but aside from being the world's largest information technology (IT) company, IBM is also the world's largest consulting organization, with talented people as scientists, engineers, consultants, and sales professionals in more than 160 countries. IBM’s global capabilities include: services, software, hardware, research and financing. 6.1 Who IBM is with

IBM's clients include many different kinds of enterprises, from sole proprietorships to the world's largest organizations, governments and companies representing every major industry and endeavour. The majority of the company's enterprise business occurs in industries that are broadly grouped into six sectors: Financial Services: Banking, Financial Markets, Insurance

Public: Education, Government, Healthcare, Life Sciences
Industrial: Aerospace, Automotive, Defence, Chemical and Petroleum, Electronics Distribution: Consumer Products, Retail, Travel, Transportation Communications: Telecommunications, Media and Entertainment, Energy and Utilities Small and Medium Business: Mainly companies with less than 1,000 employees 6.2 IBM’s Business Model

The company's business model is built to support two principal goals: helping clients succeed in delivering business value by becoming more innovative, efficient and competitive through the use of business insight and information technology (IT) solutions; and, providing long-term value to shareholders. The business model is flexible, and allows for periodic change and rebalancing. In addition, the company has transformed itself into a globally integrated enterprise which has improved overall productivity and is driving investment and participation in the world's fastest growing markets. 6. HISTORY OF IBM

7.3 The Origin of IBM
The roots of IBM date back to the 1880s, decades before the development of electronic computers. The company was formed through a merger of three different companies: the Tabulating Machine Company (with origins in Washington, D.C. in the 1880s), the International Time Recording Company...
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