Analysis of Daisy of the Great Gatsby

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Daisy Of The Great Gatsby

Chapter One of The Great Gatsby is not extensive, however still reveals a great deal regarding the individuals in the novel. The narrator, Nick Carraway, sets the novel on the shore of Long Island during the 1920’s. He introduces and analyzes the people who drift into his life throughout this chapter. Daisy, a well-off young woman who is Nick’s cousin-twice removed, is introduced as a morose, shallow, and realistic character.

Initially, Daisy Buchanan comes off as a one-dimensional, ditsy person who is nothing out of the ordinary. As Nick becomes more acquainted with her, she reveals more about herself through her actions and words. Further into the novel, it becomes more apparent she is sullen. When her and Nick are unaccompanied, he observes, “I saw turbulent emotions possessed her” (Fitzgerald 16). Without any provocation on the subject, Daisy herself goes on to say, “‘Well, I’ve had a very bad time, Nick, and I’m pretty cynical about everything’” (Fitzgerald 16). Though not much is divulged about the root of Daisy’s despondency at this point, one can infer that at least one component is her husband’s blatant unfaithfulness to her. Her final reference to her unhappiness begins with her telling the story of her daughter’s birth, where at a time supposed to be full of great happiness she made a very cynical comment; conveying how truly negative she is. She finishes her story by saying, “’You see, I think everything’s terrible anyhow’” (Fitzgerald 17). Though it is lavish, Daisy is clearly not very happy with her life.

The reader sees events through Nick’s eyes, and though he makes no judgments about Daisy, she comes across as a ditzy and superficial individual. As her husband Tom was discussing a book he had recently read, she dimly states, “’Tom’s getting very profound,’ said Daisy, with an expression of unthoughtful sadness. ‘He reads deep books with long words in them’” (Fitzgerald 13). Daisy has proved herself capable of at...
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