Analysis of Act 3, Dolls House

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In my opinion Act III is where the author Ibsen really wants to show Nora's independence and also her feminist movement. I believe it is right to say that this Act is about feminism. In act III after the tarantella dance, Torvald seems to believe that Nora is his property and treats her like an object. Torvald starts to make sexual passes on her in a conversation yet she holds back as she does not want to; she goes against his wishes. This is form of growth in her character as she is now able to say no to her husband, instead of following all his wishes, a quote that supports this statement is from page 215 ‘no Torvald, go away. Leave me alone – I don't want –' (215, Ibsen). This conversation with Nora and Torvald is a component of foreshadowing of how Nora is now able to stand up for herself and is able to express her opinions to her husband, as well as how she is equal to Torvald and must also take care of her needs and wants. The ending of the book after Torvald received the letter from Krogstad sending back Nora's bond, it shows how Nora establishes herself as an equal to Torvald and says that ‘I believe that before everything else I'm a human being – just as much as you are.' (228 Ibsen). This shows that she as developed a sense of self, confidence, and independency. After 8 years Nora only beings to realize who Torvald really is and what he really wants from her and how he perceives her. He does not see her as an equal nor does her love her for who she is, he loves her for what she looks like and how she impresses the society around them. Her Nora believes she is as worthy as he is and knows that she has self worth just as much as Torvald does. She also knows that she won't be able to express her feelings at her home so she leaves home to find herself.

Bibliography: 'A Dolls House' By Henrik Ibsen
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