Analysis Between Asean and Apec

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ASEAN and APEC are two organisations that are involved with the aid, stability and economic growth of all countries associated with them. ASEAN stands for Association of Southeast Asian Nations and includes countries such as Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand along of course with Australia. APEC is the Asia-Pacific Economic Corporation and they focus on working to reduce tariffs and other trade barriers across the Asia-Pacific region, creating efficient domestic economies and dramatically increasing exports. The two demographics that I have chosen to compare are Burma and China. Burma and China both come from either ASEAN or APEC and I am going to compare the two on aid, defence, migration and trade. (Maps are on the last few pages)

The Australian Government, through the Australian Agency for International Development, has provided almost 30 years of development assistance to China. AusAID continues to work in partnership with China to build on these achievements and provide expertise to help China in its development reform agenda. Australia assists China with aid for environment and health. With the rapid growth and development of China in the recent decades has caused severe environmental problems. Constant demand of the natural resources to bring about rapid industrialisation and urbanisation has led to high levels of pollution, ecological degradation and water shortages. Over the past decade Australia has set up a forefront of aid operations to deal with this situation and of the 7 projects so far from 2002-2008 a total of 5 have been completed with Australia donating $2.08 million towards water entitlements and trading activity, $12.25 million to the Qinghai forestry resources management, $9.1 million to Kars environmental rehabilitation and $14.9 million has gone towards the water and agricultural management in Hubei. All of these environmental projects have added up to Australia donating a staggering $38.32 million dollars to aid the environment in the industrialised areas of China. In terms of medical AusAID has completed 1 of its two projects in the past 8 years. Australia donated a total of $19.2 million to the Tibet health sector support program which was completed in 2010 and in the fight against HIV AIDS we have donated a humungous $25 million to the cause. Aid in Burma is much like China in the way that we help. Australia supports Burma with health aid, Sustainable economic development, Saving lives, Promoting opportunities for all, Humanitarian and disaster response and Effective governance. With all of these aid categories we can define that Australia in reality is providing more aid to assist with the health and growth of Burma more so than China. For the years 2012-2013 Australia is estimating to spend a total of $63.8 million, divided up into the different categories. To put this into comparison, AusAID spent a grand total of 82 million dollars on both health and environment aid to china with our contribution in Burma sitting at $63.8 million. China is significantly larger than Burma in population and size of country so is it right that we are handing them at least $19 million more than Burma when China is also the leading exporters in the world with almost the world’s entire manufacturing taking place on their shores? Should Australia really need to provide aid to Australia except for under the circumstances of a natural disaster or an attack of any sort? This leads into my next comparison of military. Although there have been wars in the past, the military relationship with Australia and China couldn’t be better right now with things sailing smoother than ever before. This year Australia marks 40 years since the establishment of diplomatic relations between Australia and the People’s Republic of China. Over that time, our military to military and defence to defence relationship is growing from strength to strength. In November and December last year, the Australian...
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