Analysis and Review of Andrew Niccol's Film Gattaca

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We want to give your child the best possible start. Believe me, we have enough imperfection built in already. Your child doesn't need any more additional burdens. Keep in mind, this child is still you. Simply, the best, of you. You could conceive naturally a thousand times and never get such a result. – Geneticist Consultant

The world in which we live in today derives itself from science, which has provided modern man the life of ease, leisure, and luxury. It has invented machines able to pinpoint cancerous sites in the body, able news to be transmitted around the globe at lightning speed. Man has already landed on the moon, and Sputnik has enabled research on other solar planets. Lives have become healthier, longer, with modern hygiene, sanitation, medicine, and surgery, conquering more physical and mental illnesses by the month. Science has also presented a means of cloning and genetically modifying organisms and food, and shows little to slow it’s pace of evolution.

I belonged to a new underclass, no longer determined by social status or the color of your skin. No, we now have discrimination down to a science. - Vincent

Gattaca, directed by Andrew Niccol, gives a perspective of what the future of discrimination is to evolve into: no longer determined by skin color, gender, or social status, but scientific DNA. The civilization portrayed is a discriminatory one, in which status and quality of lifestyle is determined solely by a DNA profile. Children are created by DNA manipulation to produce an impeccable genetic composition, with parents able to buy whatever traits are deemed fanciable for their child. The movie hypothesizes this as a potential practice in the not too distant future, as one where technology’s influence in everyday life is at peak.

True or False? It is impossible for our society to become like the one in the movie, ‘Gattaca’, because we don’t have the technology or the capacity to discriminate that way.

This essay will argue...
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