An Overview of Urban Regeneration

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INTRODUCTION

1.0An Overview of Urban Regeneration

According to Withgott and Brennan (2007), people are now live at a turning point. Beginning about the year 2007, for the first time in the human history, more people will live in the urban areas than in rural areas. The development of social diversity is one of the principal objectives of urban regeneration. It aims at attracting new inhabitants in degraded districts but also preventing their inhabitants to leave them as soon as the situation has improved.

To reach such an objective requires establishing a strong bond between economic development and physical regeneration. These two themes of urban regeneration are, indeed, complementary; insofar they allow a work in the fields of social development and improvement of environment. The first aims at making the inhabitants reach training and employment and the second tends to support their maintenance on the spot and attract new residents, by improving the quality of urban life.

1.1Introduction of the Study

As the world massively moving into modernization and world without boundaries, urban tourism has become an important economic source for city areas. Either in developed countries or developing countries, tourism has been allowed to be placed as an important urban function. This study will emphasize on the urban regeneration in sense of designing an urban tourism. The study will show how the post-industrial city being transferred into major attraction among tourists. We will analyze how the social mobilization will impact the city to be regenerated. Last but not least, how the preservation and function of heritage resources in the city affects urban regeneration.

1.2Problem Statement

The growth of tourism industry increase tremendously after 1970’s in urban areas. Ironically for industrial city, tourism industry is alienated or neglected from being part of the urban function. However, as the industry growth bigger and successfully attract major income for certain countries, the city area was facing stage of renewal or redevelopment in order to generate urban tourism. While urban regeneration projects and programs are by definition implemented in the existing city, it is a question of acting in-depth on the existing city and of reducing its dysfunctions.

In Malaysia, urban regeneration is not a bombastic thing that ever happened. It does not even exist in Malaysia. That is the major problem facing by cities in Malaysia especially those that been developed during colonial era. And for this study, it is purposely focus on Taiping, Perak due to the history track where it is the first city in Malaysia that been built. And now, it’s facing the decline stage where it needs to be re-branded and rejuvenate.

1.3Research Objectives

In view of the above deliberation, the following objectives are being considered:

a. To identify the needs of urban regeneration as the urban tourism push factor. b. To examine the impact of social mobilization towards urban regeneration c. To examine the needs of heritage towards urban regeneration

1.4 Research Questions

a. What are the needs of urban regeneration to become as the urban tourism push factor? b. Does the social mobilization incorporating with urban regeneration? c. How we can analyze the needs of cultural and heritage towards urban regeneration?

ANSWERS

2. Overview

Following World War II, and continuing into the early 1970s, “urban regeneration” referred primarily to public efforts to revitalize aging and decaying inner cities, although some suburban communities undertook such projects as well. Including massive demolition, slum clearance, and rehabilitation, urban regeneration in America proceeded initially from local and state legislation, which in Illinois included the Neighborhood Redevelopment Corporation Act of 1941 (amended in 1953),...
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