An Introduction to the Game of Golf

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  • Topic: Golf, Rules of golf, Golf ball
  • Pages : 10 (4576 words )
  • Download(s) : 46
  • Published : October 20, 2010
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Michael May
Golf: An Introduction to the Game with an Emphasis on the Last Twenty-Five Years Abstract
The game of golf has changed ever since its creation in the 1400's. Yet of all the changes in the game most of them have come within the last 25 years. Golf has developed and changed so much in the last 25 years that players and spectators alike can barely keep up with this new style of play. Research demonstrates some of the basic elements of the game, as well as most of the developmental changes the game has gone through in the last 25 years. Jeff Mashos, a former P.G.A. professional, gives his insight on the game and the changes he has seen in recent years. For golfers and golf spectators this is a brief glimpse at how golf has progressed in the last 25 years.

“Unlike the bowler who can roll a perfect 300 game, nobody can ever master a golf game…golf is a humbling game, and most people with perfectionist tendencies will abandon the game before they get good enough to enjoy playing” (Burleson Company Inc.). Why is this? Golf has undergone many changes in the last 25 years and consists of numerous modifications in the elements of the game. Therefore, research on the basic elements of golf and the recent technological advancements suggests golf is a more complex sport than it used to be. The earliest studies of golf's technological advancements indicated that the game of golf has developed so rapidly over the last 60 years, that it has completely changed the game from what it was before. Because the game of golf has had such a long history, it is hard to determine who has done the first study on this topic. A lot of information is provided, but no one person can be credited for doing the first study. Many of the major technological developments in the last sixty years have been in the design of golf clubs and balls. Clubs from the 1400's to the early 1900's were made from many different types of wood. It wasn't until the 1920's that golf clubs began to use metal pieces, and in the 1970's golf clubs became almost all metal (Golf Europe). Golf is a sport which consists of many different elements. It involves the swing, the stance, the natural elements, to even the mental focus average people exert just to keep themselves from throwing their clubs (Hyder 32). Many of the major technological developments in the last sixty years have been in the design of golf clubs and balls. Clubs from the 1400's to the early 1900's were made from many different types of wood. It wasn't until the 1920's that golf clubs began to use metal pieces; by the 70's golf clubs became almost all metal (A History of Golf since 1497). Since then the biggest advancements have been on the clubs grooves. The golf clubs have gone from using U grooves, to square grooves, and now to using triangle grooves. These three major changes have all made their mark in the last 25 years. First and foremost is the analysis of a golfers' swing. The objective of any golfers swing is to find a style which fits them and their abilities. This will allow players’ to hit the ball far and have good control of the ball’s flight path (McCord 11). One must focus on several key areas in order to have a good swing. First, the club the player is hitting needs to be on the correct plane. If the club head gets off course, the ball will not be straight. The ball can actually do several things depending on how the ball lines up with the golf club's face. The first obstacle most people struggle with is the intimidating slice. The slice (when a ball severely turns right after contact) is accomplished when the club head is open at impact with the golf ball. The second major problem that people struggle with is the hook (When a ball severely turns left after contact). This occurs when the club head starts too far inside the ball and then pushes out past the ball after contact (Frank 79). Dick Aultman author of The Square to Square Golf Swing describes the two...
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