An Introduction to Green Innovations

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  • Topic: Carbon dioxide, Efficient energy use, Energy Star
  • Pages : 14 (3702 words )
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  • Published : October 19, 2010
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Title : “Green Innovation in IT”


1) Prof. Zarina Shaikh , Asst Professor,

Poona Institute of Management Sciences and Entrepreneurship

Email:, Mobile : 9881737229

2) Prof. Sheena Abraham, Lecturer,

Poona Institute of Management Sciences and Entrepreneurship

Email:, Mobile : 9881736413


Most organizations are, at best, in the very early stages of addressing green IT as a wider issue. In recent years, companies in the computer industry have come to realize that going green is in their best interest, both in terms of public relations and reduced costs. Symantec Corp. released a study that revealed almost 75 percent of datacenter managers do, in fact, have an interest in adopting a strategic green center initiative, but only one in seven has actually done so—Symantec, October 2007. Meeting the green computing challenges is not just a top concern or a high priority for IT equipment users only. IT equipment vendors must be a major part of the green computing movement.

Green Innovations refers to the advance technology supporting business critical computing needs with least possible amount of power or sustainable computing. This represents a dramatic change in priority in IT industry. It came from ever growing business computing needs, fast growing burden of energy cost, growing awareness of global warming issues, and increasing sense of national energy security. Energy is an increasingly scarce and expensive resource. This reality will continue to have a profound effect on how IT solutions are designed, deployed, and used. Most eco-innovations in the IT sector have focused on technological advances in the form of product and process modification or redesign. Rapid economic growth in country and the increasing transboundary movement of secondary resources will increasingly require both 3R endeavors (reduce, reuse, recycle) in each country and appropriate control of international material cycles.

The objective of this paper is to a review of how IT equipment power consumption across the industry is changing the IT industry priority. It will briefly cover the need of general green innovations in the IT industry in the race to meet green computing requirement.


Green Computing, CO2 emissions, Power Management, Virtualization, Global Warming, VOIP, RoHS, SPUR


For many years now many ICT people have been fond of saying things like “the computer industry consumes as much power as the airline industry” or “ICT is 2% of the world’s carbon footprint” or a Google search consumes as much electricity as boiling a kettle”. Technology obsolescence and mounting electronic waste, coupled with power guzzling data centers, were cited as the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industry’s contribution to the negative impact on the environment.

The CO2 emissions of some everyday activities and compared them to "Google searches" are follows :

• CO2 emissions of an average daily newspaper (100% recycled paper) is 850

• A glass of orange juice is 1,050

• One load of dishes in an Energy Star dishwasher is 5,100

• A five mile trip in the average U.S. automobile is 10,000

• A cheeseburger is 15,000

• Electricity consumed by the average US household in one month is 3,100,000.


Figure 1 : Carbon Footprints 2009 by device category (%)

Based on each country's population and historical contribution to climate change, the chart below depicts how much carbon "budget" countries have if we were to equitably distribute the right to emit carbon in the future. The pale color shows how much a country has "consumed" (i.e. "emitted") and the dark color shows how much budget remains. The United States has a negative carbon budget, shown by the dark bar below the horizontal axis, implying that an equitable distribution of...
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