An Analysis of Oedipus the King by Sophocles

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  • Topic: Oedipus, Oedipus the King, Tragedy
  • Pages : 3 (940 words )
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  • Published : January 7, 2013
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Austin Jones
December 2, 2012
English Period B
Ms. Mazz
Oedipus the King:

1. Free will plays a greater role than fate in this play. Fate plays a greater role because the characters make their own decisions. They make the decisions that lead to their downfall. An example of how free will plays a greater role than fate in this play is when Oedipus decides to continue his search for his real parents. Jocasta warns him and tells him to call of the search. “Stop. In the name of god, if you love your own life, call of this search! My suffering is enough.” (Page 939 Lines 1162-1163) He doesn’t listen to her. He decides to continue his search and it ultimately leads to his downfall. Even though Oedipus was given his fate, it was his choices that led to it. If he didn’t choose to do continue his search, his fate would’ve never come true. That is how free will plays a greater role than fate in this play. 2. It is particularly ironic that Tiresias, the prophet, is blind. It is ironic that he blind because he can see the truth and Oedipus cannot. Tiresias says that he knows that Oedipus killed his own father and that he can see the truth. He says he can see the truth when he is blind, which is ironic. He tells Oedipus that he is the reason for the corruption of Thebes. “You are the curse, the corruption of the land!” (Page 921 Line 401) When Oedipus mocks his blindness, he says that Oedipus is blind to the corruption of his own life. He says that he cannot see that he killed his own father. “So, you mock my blindness? Let me tell you this. You with your precious eyes, you’re blind to the corruption of your life, to the house you live in.” (Page 923 Lines 467-471) Tiresias can see the corruption of Oedipus’ life even though he is blind, which is ironic. That is how it is ironic that Tiresias is blind. 3. A “tragic hero” is the main character in a play that has a flaw, which leads to their downfall. Oedipus fits this definition. He fits this definition...
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