An Analysis of Frankenstein by Mary Shelly

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The original 1818 text of Frankenstein is an attention grabber, can’t put it down kind of novel. It is written by Mary Shelly, an English novelist from Somers Town, London. It’s a novel based around relationships and loss that’s full of mystery, emotion and suspense that kept me wanting to jump ahead just to get answers. Frankenstein is written in the form of having three different narrators, which I personally enjoy because then you get perspectives from more than just the one main character. It begins with a letter written from Robert Walton to his sister Mrs. Margaret Saville. He writes of the journey that his crew and he are embarking upon on the sea. He speaks of how lonely he is until they rescue a man floating on a large fragment of ice who soon becomes a dear friend to Robert. The new friend speaks of why he is in these circumstances by talking to Robert of his history. The following narrative comes from the man which Robert and his crew have saved, Victor Frankenstein. Victor tells his story of his family and his adventures, but most importantly, this monster that he has created. Lastly, is the narration from the monster himself. He tells the tale of his journey, the troubles he’s had to overcome and the reasoning behind the killings that he’s committed. I would say this novel is a text of bliss. At times, it leaves you with a loss of comfort and feeling uneasy of what you’re reading. Particularly, I didn’t like reading of how Victor was being blackmailed by the monster. It made me feel unsettled. Having to do something against your will to keep the ones you love and care for out of harm’s way would be an awful thing to be forced into. But even more, I was left uncomfortable while reading of the murders. Being strangled or dying because of a loss of breath has always been a way that I’ve been terrified to go. This novel is a great example of relationships. Towards the beginning is when I noticed the most, Victor speaks of the relation...
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