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American Revolution Radical

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American Revolution Radical

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  • November 2010
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Odd Job 4 American Revolution
Though often portrayed as a moderate effort to remove British control, the American Revolution was radical in the ideals established throughout the revolution. The American Revolution had significant effects on American society as a whole radically changing certain aspects including its social, political, economic, and religious contexts. Also, the status of women, slaves, and Loyalists were radically changed through this endeavor. However, the American Revolution occurred over 3,500 miles away from Britain, the economy was still heavily reliant on Britain, and the acceptance and of Loyalists back into American society and the refrain from their execution are all contributing factors to the case that the American Revolution was moderate. A new democratized political system was formed through the constitution, which embodied radical ideals such as the equality of all men, the separation of church and state, religious freedom/tolerance, etc. Breen states “that ordinary men and women had reason to be thankful that whatever their country had become, it had commenced as a society committed to rights and equality, radical concepts then and now” (IH 141). Cummings believes that the British belief of superiority “profoundly affected the substance of American political ideology” that all men are created equal (153). Monarchial rule was overthrown and the power of the government now lied among its citizens. “In the absence of the Monarchy, a new religious order was established, but the radical views of the revolutionaries with regards to religious tolerance sounded throughout both state and the federal constitutions” allowing people to practice their beliefs freely (www.scribd.com). The American colonies could now trade with whoever they wanted and regulate their trade along with...