American Revolution: American Romanticism

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American Romanticism

American Romanticism was a literary and artistic movement of the nineteenth century that placed a premium on fancy, imagination, emotion, nature, individuality, and exotica. It was the Romantic period in American Literature, which included writers like Washington Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, and others. One characteristic of American Romanticism involves humanity's relationship to nature. Much of the writing during this period revolves around the idea that, in nature, people will have a natural desire to behave well. American Romanticism also deals with the individualism. It explores the links between one human being and another. There was little character development in writing at this time. Writers in this period saw elements of Gothicism, attaching weird or strange qualities to characters. Many of these writers were filled with a desire to search for beauty or freedom.

The part I liked the most about American Romanticism was the fact it deals with nature and imagination. The reason I say that is because nature is peaceful and calm. When you write about nature as most American Romanticism literary writers did, it catches reader’s attention. For me when I have to read about nature I’m always up for it since it calms me down and I love reading about nature. I liked how they celebrated emotions and the imaginations they had into words.

There is not much to dislike about American Romanticism but there was one thing that irked me. The thing that I ostracized about American Romanticism was that the American Gothic‘s didn’t believe in the natural goodness of people. That part they don’t believe in goodness of people is just insulting. Every human in its own way has good qualities about themselves but for someone to not believe person’s goodness is offending. I believe that everyone in this world has heart that cares for others and has good qualities & that why I disliked the fact they didn’t believe in goodness of people.

Early Romantics

The early American romantics’ writers were influenced more by literature of other regions than their own. Romanticism had first arisen in Europe in the late 18th century. Romantics looked to nature for motivation & were inspired by the beauty of nature. They also emphasized emotions and the imagination over reason & praised the individual spirit. The First American romantic writer grew up in a European tradition. This era of American Romanticisms included writers such as Washington Irving, James Fenimore & William Cullen Bryant. This era of American Romanticism influenced the era American Romanticism later on. The writers of this era were set as an example and the writers basically followed their footsteps to be successful. They also continued their legacy and writing style. William Cullen Bryant was a literary superstar, and was consider a genius at a young age. James Fenimore Cooper even called Bryant “the author of America” because he helped create a unique American literature. Bryant left a huge mark on American literature as one of the first poet to takeover English poet. Bryant was born in 1794 in Cummington, Massachusetts. Unlike other writer Bryant started his writing career at a young age. Bryant was a writer that wrote mostly poems and that too about nature. He was the editor in chief of the “New Your Evening Post” and he maintained that spot till his death. Even though he didn’t publish many writings, the once he published were just brilliant. One of his famous poems was “Thanatopsis” which was inspired by his meandering in the countryside. William Cullen Bryant wrote the poem “Thanatopsis” when he was only 18 years old. The poem is about death. In this poem he is basically saying there is no reason to fear death because you become a part of all nature. The title of the poem means “views of death” stating his view of death. He thinks humans shouldn’t fear death, it’s...
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