American Pageant Chapter 19 Review

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Chapter 19: Drifting Toward Disunion

Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
- Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin intended to show the cruelty of slavery. - Uncle Tom's Cabin may be described as a powerful political force.
- As a result of reading Uncle Tom's Cabin, many northerners swore that they would have.
-When the people of Britain and France read Uncle Tom's Cabin, their governments realized that intervention in the Civil War on behalf of the South would not be popular.

The Impending Crisis of the South by Hinton R. Helper
- Hinton R. Helper's book The Impending Crisis of the South argued that those who suffered most from slave labor were nonslaveholding southern whites.
Bleeding Kansas
- In "Bleeding Kansas" in the mid-1850s, the Lecompton Constitution was identified with the proslavery element, and the New England Immigrant Aid Society was associated with the antislavery free-soilers.

Lecompton Constitution
- In "Bleeding Kansas" in the mid-1850s, the Lecompton Constitution was identified with the proslavery element, and the New England Immigrant Aid Society was associated with the antislavery free-soilers. - President James Buchanan's decision on Kansas's Lecompton Constitution hopelessly divided the Democratic Party. - The Lecompton Constitution proposed that the state of Kansas have black bondage regardless of whether the document was approved or not. - Kansas Territory's Lecompton Constitution was supported by President James Buchanan and proslavery settlers in Kansas.

Popular Sovereignty
- The situation in Kansas in the mid-1850s indicated the impracticality of popular sovereignty in the territories.

Preston S. Brooks
- The clash between Preston S. Brooks and Charles Sumner revealed the fact that passions over slavery were becoming dangerously inflamed in both North and South.

Charles Sumner
- The clash between Preston S. Brooks and Charles Sumner revealed the fact that passions over slavery were becoming dangerously inflamed in both North and South.

John Fremont
- In the election of 1856, John Fremont was a republican

Millard Fillmore
- In the election of 1856, Millard Fillmore was a Know-Nothing

Martin Van Buren
- Democrat

James Buchanan
- President James Buchanan's decision on Kansas's Lecompton Constitution hopelessly divided the Democratic Party. - Kansas Territory's Lecompton Constitution was supported by President James Buchanan and proslavery settlers in Kansas. - James Buchanan won the Democratic nomination for the presidency in 1856 because he was not associated with the Kansas-Nebraska Act. - "Lame-duck" President James Buchanan believed that the Constitution did not authorize him to force southern states to stay in the Union. - President James Buchanan declined to use force to keep the South in the Union for all of the following reasons except that he believed that the Constitution allowed secession. - In the election of 1856, James Buchanan was a democrat.

Abraham Lincoln
- The political career of Abraham Lincoln could best be described as slow to get off the ground. - As a result of the Lincoln-Douglas debates, Douglas defeated Lincoln for the Senate. - Stephen A. Douglas argued in his Freeport Doctrine during the Lincoln-Douglas debates that action by territorial legislatures could keep slavery out of the territories. - Abraham Lincoln won the 1860 Republican Party presidential nomination in part because he had made fewer enemies than front-runner William Seward. - Before his nomination in 1860, Abraham Lincoln had been a state legislator in Illinois, a United States congressman from Illinois, and a failed candidate for the United States Senate. - In the election of 1860, Abraham Lincoln won a majority in the Electoral College and won less than a majority of the popular vote. - When Abraham Lincoln won the 1860 presidential election, people in South Carolina rejoiced because it...
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