American History, The Civil War ruined the economy

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* The Civil War ruined the economy, making it one of the two or three poorest states for the next century. Educational levels were low as public schools were underfunded, especially for African Americans * Most people lived on small farms and grew cotton. The more affluent were landowners, who subdivided the land into farms operated by tenant farmers or sharecroppers, along with land operated by the owner using hired labor. Gradually more industry moved into the Piedmont area, with textile factories that turned the state's raw cotton into yarn and cloth for sale on the international market. Wave after wave of revivals made most people quite religious; most people, white and black alike, were Baptists. * Meanwhile, the impoverished state maintained polices of discrimination and segregation that led many African Americans to seek better lives and opportunities in the North.

By the 1750s, rice and indigo had made the planters and merchants of the South Carolina Lowcountry the wealthiest men in what would become the United States. White Protestant immigrants continued to pour in, settling in the interior and joined by German, Scots-Irish and Welsh settlers who were relocating from colonies farther north. In the Sea Islands along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, a unique culture, Gullah, was evolving among African slaves brought to work the rice fields and their descendants. The Sea Island slaves were the first to be emancipated following the Civil War, and the language, traditions, and customs of the Gullah culture have survived the centuries * had become one of the largest cities in the colonies. A major port with a booming trade and agricultural economy, and an extremely pleasant climate, it’s no wonder that Charleston became such a popular place to live. * Charleston was the Colonial melting pot, a picture of the ethnic and cultural diversity we cherish in our country today. Early settlers arrived mainly from England, but...
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