American Government

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Assignment 2: Current Events Research Paper By Tuesday, February 12, 2013, draft a paper that critically analyzes a current, domestic or foreign political issue of importance to the United States. Students will (1) identify a current political event to analyze; (2) research and summarize the different approaches to understanding the political issue selected; (3) provide a clear, personal analysis of the issue and an explanation of the core values and assumptions that informs their analysis. The student will be expected to support their discussion with primary texts and from pre-approved secondary sources (including, but not limited to the course text, online lectures, and a list of suggested online resources). Your paper should be 6–8 pages in length and include proper APA citation. Submit your essay to the appropriate topic in the W5: Assignment 2 Dropbox. Remember, you should utilize information provided from each week of the course to complete your essay www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/unemployment-rate United States Unemployment RateUnemployment Rate in the United States increased to 7.90 percent in January of 2013 from 7.80 percent in December of 2012. Unemployment Rate in the United States is reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Historically, from 1948 until 2013, the United States Unemployment Rate averaged 5.81 Percent reaching an all time high of 10.80 Percent in November of 1982 and a record low of 2.50 Percent in May of 1953. In the United States, the unemployment rate measures the number of people actively looking for a job as a percentage of the labour force. This page includes a chart with historical data for the United States Unemployment Rate. | | |

United States Unemployment Rate at 7.9%, Payroll Employment RisesBLS | Nuno Fontes | nuno@tradingeconomics.com | 2/1/2013 1:36:00 PM Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 157,000 in January, and the unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 7.9 percent. Retail trade, construction, health care, and wholesale trade added jobs over the month. The number of unemployed persons, at 12.3 million, was little changed in January. The unemployment rate was 7.9 percent and has been at or near that level since September 2012. Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (7.3 percent), adult women (7.3 percent), teenagers (23.4 percent), whites (7.0 percent), blacks (13.8 percent), and Hispanics (9.7 percent) showed little or no change in January. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.5 percent (not seasonally adjusted), little changed from a year earlier. In January, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was about unchanged at 4.7 million and accounted for 38.1 percent of the unemployed. Both the employment-population ratio (58.6 percent) and the civilian labor force participation rate (63.6 percent) were unchanged in January. The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons, at 8.0 million, changed little in January. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job. In January, 2.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down by 366,000 from a year earlier (not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey. Among the marginally attached, there were 804,000 discouraged workers in January, a decline of 255,000 from a year earlier (not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.6 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in January had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for...
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