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American Government

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  • April 16, 2013
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Chapter 8: Interest Groups
1. How many interest groups are involved in the major legislative and executive proposals that come before Congress? There is a diverse array of interest groups that are involved in major legislative and executive proposals in the United States. 2. Business groups may be involved more in what type of issues? Business groups tend to be involved in policy struggles such as tax and regulatory issues. 3. Ideological and advocacy groups may be more involved in what type of issues? These groups are more involved in social issues such as abortion and affirmative action. 4. What are interest groups?

Interest groups are private organizations and voluntary associations that try to influence what the government does. 5. Why do you think they sometimes called pressure groups? I think they are sometimes called pressure groups is because they appear to try to influence everyone to do what they want resulting in the government being pressured to do what they want. 6. James Madison wanted to write the Constitution in such a way as to protect the nation from the evils of what? He wanted to protect this nation from the evils of factions which are groups and parties that try to advance their own interests at the expense of the public good. 7. How did Madison define the term you used for your answer in number 7 above? He defined as “a number of citizens, whether amounting to a majority or minority of the whole, who are united and actuated by some common impulse of passion, or of interest, adverse to the rights of other citizens or the permanent and aggregate interests of the community.” 8. In Madison’s terms, today’s interest groups would be majority or minority factions? Today’s interest groups would be called majority factions in Madison terms. 9. What were the two ways Madison believed that the Constitution controlled minority factions? The two ways Madison believed that the Constitution...