American Dream- Gatsby

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American Dream
According to the definition of the American dream by James Truslow Adams in 1931, “life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement” regardless of social class or circumstances of birth. Typically, the dreamer aspires to rise from rags to riches, ultimately achieving a high status, wealth, and power that can lead to the top. The American dream has changed over time, although the concept of it is still based on ideas of freedom, the desire for greater expectations, and enhanced self-esteem. In general, the American dream emphasizes more a convenient and affluent life filled with luxury. However, over time the actual purpose was distorted and became more like a materialistic vision; people wanted more and more, seemingly without end. In the book The Great Gatsby, Daisy Buchannan was depicted as a typical feature of the American dream: materialistic. She is so blinded by money, possession, and luxuries that she did not understand that happiness or love cannot be bought with by money. In this book, Fitzgerald emphasized the corruption of the American dream by showing Daisy as an example of materialism, social status, and adultery. Just like little child who is longing for more toys, Daisy in this book clearly represents the concept of materialism and someone who wants more and more. In other words, she feels the need to abound in materials like money or jewels. When Gatsby described Daisy’s indiscreet voice, he said “Her voice is full of money” (Fitzgerald 120). The phrase “voice full of money” demonstrates Daisy’s corrupted characteristic that she only cares about wealth and is always longing for more money. It reveals why she is so humble about the decision of loving Gatsby or Tom, because they are both rich and Daisy wants someone who is wealthier and had more money. In her core, love itself is nothing, but the only matter is who gets more and who gets less, just like the...
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