America on Global Affairs 1880-1929

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: United States, President of the United States, Economy of the United States
  • Pages : 2 (740 words )
  • Download(s) : 738
  • Published : December 7, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
America on Global Affairs 1880-1929
United States of America set its ride to become a competitive- further a dominant, power since the Monroe Doctrine of 1823. To its advantage, America was far away from the European dominance over the world and on its own accord, geared towards industrialization, which was its root stand to become a Great Power. The U.S evolved from a continentally isolated country to a Great Power, a nation stronger than the others in Europe in such a small period of time from the end of the Civil War to the early twentieth century. However, there are different interpretations of how this Great Power became an eager expansionist nation.

Territorial expansion, the notion of expansionism, was always part of American history from its beginning. Expanding to the west and acquiring land for the ever growing nation seems like an inherited characteristic from its European ancestors. As Paul Kennedy argues in his essay The United States as New Kid on the Block, 1840-1940, the country was growing at a lightning speed and catalyzed the country to become an expansionist nation due to its booming production. His argument upon the connection between the national economy and the foreign affairs as United States became a world power gives a succinct interpretation from industrialist point of view. “The hyper productivity of American factories and farms caused a widespread fear that even its enormous domestic market might soon be unable to absorb these goods” (p.276) and pressed the government to enable overseas marketing with other nations as well as secure the trade. U.S government had to take actions in order to keep its economy and as “the consequences of this commercial transformation” (p. 276) influenced its international relations.

On the other hand, a prominent historian Gail Bederman of University of Notre Dame gives a rather interesting interpretation of American expansionism by connecting the imperialist impulse among the American...
tracking img