Amelia Earheart Movie Accuracy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 492
  • Published : April 12, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Amelia (2009)
The movie, Amelia, is historically accurate in depicting what the life of Amelia Earheart, a woman who represented change in traditional female roles through the Roaring Twenties and early thirties, would have been like. The movie elaborated on the many inventions that were new or more popular at the time such as the radio, airplane, and the automobile. The movie also had a great visual feel of the late twenties and early thirties through costume design. Another item the movie used to make it historically accurate is the roles in society such as the need for women in their traditional roles, and the fame the women who did not stay within their roles received. Music was accurate within the movie as well with its upbeat sound. Finally, the moral compass of the time in terms of getting rich truly demonstrates the fact that people were willing to do anything for money. This shows that the most important thing to people of the time was to get rich. The life of Amelia in terms of its’ historical truth is also well represented in the film. Each of these categories, technology, fashion, roles in society, music, morality, as well as the historical truth about Amelia’s life evidently proves the movies accuracy.

Technology during the Roaring Twenties and early thirties changed America drastically. Throughout the movie we see accurate automobile models of the time, such as the Model T Ford. In comparison to earlier times, there appears to be more vehicles on the streets. Prior to the affordable Model T, very few owned vehicles. Amelia and other pilots were shown flying planes that were still primitive, and are shown with newer models throughout the film. The movie captured the quick growth in technology during the late twenties and early thirties, as well as the interest from both men and women alike in regards to it. Another piece of important technology from the 20’s, the radio, is used several times during the movie as an entertainment system, as well as a way of broadcasting news. It was a very important part of the twenties because it was the quickest way to hear about current events, as well as the most affordable household entertainment system.

The costume design in the movie is accurate. Amelia’s strange taste in style is pointed out to her by those around her. It was strange for women of the time to wear trousers. The women like Amelia, were generally flapper like women who were “different”. She had short hair and wore boy like clothing. In one scene, George Putnam, Amelia’s boss and husband, tells her he thought the trousers were because she wanted to be one of the boys, when it was really about her not liking her legs. In one scene, Amelia is also shown wearing a very low cut dress that went down to her shins. This was typically more scandalous for the older women of the time; however, it was part of the new age fashion. Women’s outfits became shorter in some cases, as well as a bit more revealing. Women began wearing what they deemed fit for themselves and used this new found freedom of choice to break free of their traditional roles.

The female roles in society during the late twenties and early thirties were still very much traditional; however it was also a great turning point. It is during this period of time that the women’s roles were set to change by a loud minority who thought that it was their right to have rights. They knew they could do what men could do. Amelia demonstrated this small minority as a woman who wanted to fly like the men. She was tired of not being able to fly because people thought she was unable due to her sex. So she did what other women like her did, she stood up to societies standards and showed that even as a woman, she could fly a plane, and fly it well. Throughout the movie we do see women who have secretarial jobs, however all females are shown with male bosses, which is very historically accurate. Although women were standing up and getting jobs, it was still a...
tracking img