Amazon Stakeholders

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http://www.amazon.com/gp/forum/cd/discussion.html?ie=UTF8&cdForum=Fx20DX5GEB7TUX8&cdThread=Tx1RLD0EXGFVC38

http://mashable.com/2010/12/01/amazon-wikileaks/

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/12/01/amazon-severs-ties-wikileaks/

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/12/01/wikileaks-relying-amazon-servers/

http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/12/amazon-and-wikileaks-first-amendment-only-strong

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Boycott-Amazon-for-Dumping-Wikileaks/174975139187861

http://knowledge.insead.edu/CrisisCommunications080609.cfm?vid=54

Whistleblower website WikiLeaks has been kicked off Amazon.com’s U.S. servers after moving its operations just a day ago. The move by Amazon comes after questioning from U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman, the chairman of the House Security Committee. “This morning Amazon informed my staff that it has ceased to host the Wikileaks website,” Sen. Lieberman said in a statement. “I wish that Amazon had taken this action earlier based on Wikileaks’ previous publication of classified material. The company’s decision to cut off Wikileaks now is the right decision and should set the standard for other companies Wikileaks is using to distribute its illegally seized material.” WikiLeaks has been the center of attention this week due to its release of more than 250,000 sensitive U.S. diplomatic cables. As a result, the U.S. government has been stepping up pressure against the website, which has also been the target of multiple distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. Yesterday, in an attempt to thwart the DDoS attacks, WikiLeaks moved its operations from its Swedish servers to Amazon Web Services, the e-commerce giant’s cloud computing and hosting platform. That didn’t even last for a day though; the whistleblower website is once again hosted on its Swedish servers. Amazon isn’t saying why it kicked WikiLeaks to the curb. While it could have been to protect its servers from inevitable DDoS attacks, we suspect pressure from the U.S. government probably had something to do with it. That’s not the only problem plaguing it, either. Yesterday, founder Julian Assange was placed on Interpol’s wanted list for sex crimes he’s accused of committing in Sweden.

Amazon.com has severed ties with controversial website WikiLeaks, the organization that just released a trove of sensitive U.S. State Department documents. Computers run by Amazon's Elastic Web Compute service in Tulsa, Portland, New York and elsewhere had been hosting the site cablegate.WikiLeaks.org, the Wall Street Journal noted on Tuesday, as well as WikiLeaks.org, the controversial site’s front page.  On Wednesday, the main website and the "cablegate" sub-site devoted to the diplomatic documents were unavailable from the U.S. and Europe. Joe Lieberman, chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, said that Amazon told him of the decision to end the relationship between the two companies. "This morning Amazon informed my staff that it has ceased to host the WikiLeaks website," Liberman said in a public statement. "The company’s decision to cut off WikiLeaks now is the right decision and should set the standard for other companies WikiLeaks is using to distribute its illegally seized material," he said in a statement. "I call on any other company or organization that is hosting WikiLeaks to immediately terminate its relationship with them," Lieberman added.  Related Links

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In a post to its Twitter feed, WikiLeaks expressed displeasure with the decision.  "WikiLeaks servers at Amazon ousted. Free speech the land of the free -- fine our $ are now spent to employ people in Europe," the Tweet reads. Availability of the sites has been spotty since Sunday, when it started to come under a series of Internet-based attacks by unknown hackers. WikiLeaks dealt with the attacks in part by moving to servers run by Amazon Web Services,...
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