Alzheimer Desease

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I. Introduction:

A. What is Alzheimer's disease?

Alzheimer's disease is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks the brain and results in disorientation, with impaired memory, thinking, and judgment. People with Alzheimer's also undergo changes in their behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to interfere with daily tasks. This combination of these symptoms is also called dementia. As mentioned above, Alzheimer's is a progressive disease, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over a number of years. In its early stages, memory loss is mild, but with late-stage Alzheimer's, individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation and respond to their environment. Alzheimer's is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Those with Alzheimer's live an average of eight years after their symptoms become noticeable to others, but survival can range from four to 20 years, depending on age and other health conditions.

II. Causes and Risk Factor:
A. age
B. gender
C. head trauma
D. family history
E. environmental toxins
F. behavior changes

III. Diagnosis Information:

B. The clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease include progressive impairment of memory loss and other cognitive functions. There are no motor, sensory, or coordination deficits early in the disease. The diagnosis cannot be determined by laboratory tests. There is no single test that proves a person has Alzheimer's. A diagnosis is made through a complete assessment that considers all possible causes, when you go to your primary doctor visit. Neuropsychological tests provide confirmatory evidence of the diagnosis of dementia and help to assess the course and response...
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