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Alternative Fuels: The industrial gas turbine

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Alternative Fuels: The industrial gas turbine

Page 1 of 19
Investigation of alternative fuels for industrial gas turbines

Tamal Bhattacharjee, Paul Nihill, Cormac Bulfin, Ishank Arora

Contents
1.Abstract4
2.Introduction4
3.Hydrogen5
3.1Production5
3.1.1Steam Reforming of Hydrocarbons5
3.1.2Water Splitting5
3.1.3Gasification of Waste & Biomass to produce syngas6 3.1.4The process7
3.1.5Application to industrial gas turbines8
4.Methanol9
4.1Abstract9
4.2Introduction9
4.3History10
4.4Manufacturing Process10
4.4.1 Production of methanol from synthesis gas10
4.5Industrial Process11
4.5.1STEP-1: Feed Production11
4.5.2STEP-2: Reforming11
4.5.3STEP-3: Methanol Synthesis12
4.5.4STEP-4: Methanol Purification12
4.6How it works on a gas turbine12
4.7Feasibility15
4.8Advantages & Disadvantages16
4.9Conclusion17
5.Power Alcohol17
5.1Introduction17
5.2Chemistry18
5.3Production18
5.3.1Ethanol from sugar cane18
5.3.2Fermentation18
5.3.3Distillation19
5.3.4Fractional Distillation19
5.4Air pollution21
5.5Advantages23
5.6Disadvantages23
6.References24

1. Abstract
The industrial gas turbine is a key part of modern electricity generation. In 1998 15% of electric power was produced by gas turbines. Due to their efficiency, compactness, reliability and relatively low capital cost 81% of new electric power demand will be met by industrial gas turbines. Gas turbines must meet very strict NOx CO and CO2 regulations. (GL Juste 2006). As the popularity of gas turbines and combined heat and power generation plants increases research has turned to cheaper and more environmentally friendly fuels for gas turbines. Methane C2H4 is the main fossil fuel used in gas turbines today but with increased regulations on carbon emissions combined with the increasing cost of fossil fuels, research is turning to alternative fuels which may power gas turbines into the future. This literature review...