Alternative Communication System During Disaster

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We have witnessed over the last three to five years many disasters both in the United States and abroad. Based on what we are hearing from NOAA and the National Weather Service the US is likely to see the same number, if not more, tropical storms this year. Storms like those of the size and ferocity of the type that were so devastating to the southern portion of the US in 2005. So, tropical storms in the US , earthquakes in South America and Asia or volcanoes anywhere else on the globe, we, humanity, face another year of potential emergencies that will need to be responded to.

One thing that all of these natural disasters have in common, besides the tremendous loss of life and disruption to everyday lives of the populous, is that they are immediately followed by an almost total loss of the ability to communicate with the outside world. Power is lost, telephone services are discontinued, and cell phone service is either non-existent or is so congested that it takes hours to get a call through.

So, every year, companies and emergency planners face the problem of providing continued communication before, during, and after a disaster strikes their areas. This year, more than any other time, in the southern part of America small, medium and large company business continuity planners are looking for alternatives to standard communications so that they can keep their business and critical operations running in the aftermath of a devastating event.

I thought that I would present some alternatives for the spectrum of business types so that those business continuity planners would have choices to make informed decisions about backup communications from.
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