Algebra in the Real World and Everyday Life

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Algebra in Business and Science
Algebra is used repeatedly in business and science for professions ranging from accountants to astronomers and physicists. The fundamental algebraic equation in accounting is assets = liabilities + capital. Accountants use this equation to balance the books. They also use algebra to calculate journal entries for interest payments and depreciation (Moore, n.d.). To analyze and work with numbers, accountants also need to understand positive and negative numbers, fractions and decimals. Other businesses that use algebra include retail stores, car dealerships and restaurants to name just a few. Each of these types of businesses sells a product and needs to calculate percentage discounts, sales or meals tax and profit margins. For science, algebra is used in astronomy, physics and chemistry. Astronomers and physicists use algebra to research and understand the universe. They observe, measure, interpret and develop theories to explain what is happening in the universe (US Bureau of Labor, 2009). One way that chemists use algebra is when mixing together chemicals. They need to calculate the correct amount of each substance to obtain the desired result. Algebraic Concepts in Everyday Life

The following are examples that I learned from the course discussion board of different ways that algebra can solve everyday life problems. ∙ To determine each person’s share of the cost for a limo ride, you would add a tip to the cost of the limo and divide by the number of riders. For example, if there were 10 kids riding in a limo and the cost of the limo was $600 (including a 20% tip), each person would pay $60. ∙ To split the cost of a restaurant bill, you would add a tip to the bill total and divide by the number of diners splitting the bill. ∙ To calculate a batting average in baseball use the following formula: Batting Average = # of hits / #of at bats. ∙ To calculate the cubic feet of a refrigerator when the height in cubic...
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