Alcohol Outline

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Lesson 1: Choosing to Be Alcohol Free
* The Facts about Alcohol
Ethanol- the type of alcohol in alcoholic beverages.
Fermentation- the chemical action of yeast on sugars.
Water, flavoring, and minerals are mixed with ethanol to produce a variety of beverages such as beer and wine. Depressant- a drug that slows the central nervous system
Intoxication- the state in which the body is poisoned by alcohol or another substance and the person’s physical and mental control is significantly reduced. * Factors That Influence Alcohol Use

Peer Pressure
Family
Media messages

* Alcohol’s Role In Unsafe Situations

Alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents are the number one cause of death and disability among teens. Alcohol is also linked with deaths by drowning, fire, suicide, and homicide. Even if you are not drinking, but are around people who are, you have an increased risk of being seriously injured, involved in a vehicle crash, and affected by violence. If you are under 21, it is illegal to buy, possess, or consume alcohol. Teens who drink alcohol are more likely to be victims or perpetrators of violent crimes such as rape, aggravated assault, and robbery. Teens who use alcohol are more likely to become sexually active at earlier ages, to engage in sexual activity more often, and to engage in unprotected sexual activirt more often than teens who do not use alcohol. Alcohol abuse—the excessive use of alcohol.

It is estimated 25 percent of all youth are exposed to alcohol abuse at some time before they reach the age of 18. Young people who live in a household in which a family member abuses alcohol are at a high risk for neglect, abuse, economic hardship, and social isolation. Most schools have adopted a zero-tolerance policy for students found using alcohol. * Being Alcohol Free

Maintain a healthy body
Make responsible decisions
Avoid risky behavior
Avoid illegal activities

Lesson 2: Harmful Effects of Alcohol Use
* Short-Term Effects of Drinking
Body size and gender.
Food.
Amount and rate of intake.
A small person feels the effect of the same amount of alcohol faster than a large person does. Alcohol moves in the bloodstream faster in females.
Food in the stomach slows down the passage of alcohol into the bloodstream. When a person drinks alcohol faster than the liver can break it down, intoxication results. When blood alcohol levels become too high, alcohol poisoning can occur. * Alcohol and Drug Interactions

Interactions between medications and alcohol can lead to illness, injury, and even death. Alcohol-drug interactions are a factor in about one-fourth of all emergency room admissions. Metabolism- the process by which the body breaks down substances. Alcohol travels through the blood-stream to the brain.

The presence of bother alcohol and medication or another drug with a person’s body can be very dangerous. Multiplier effect- in which the medication has a greater or different effect than if it were taken alone. Alcohol-Drug Interactions:

* Alcohol may slow down a drug’s absorption by the body. * Frequent drinking may increase the number of metabolizing enzymes in the body causing the medication to be broken down faster, decreasing their effectiveness. * Metabolizing enzymes can change some medications into chemicals that can damage the liver or other organs. * Alcohol can increase the effects of some drugs.

* Driving Under the Influence

Driving while intoxicated is the leading cause of death among teens. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC)- the amount of alcohol in a person’s blood, expressed as a percentage. -slows reflexes.
-reduces a person’s ability to judge distances and speeds
-increases risk-taking behaviors
-reduces a person’s concentration while increasing forgetfulness. Consequences of DWI:
Harm to the driver and others
Severely restricted driving privileges and/or immediate confiscation of a driver’s license. Alcohol...
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