Alcohol Consumption and the College Student – the Causes and Effects

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Alcohol Consumption and the College Student – The Causes and Effects December 24, 2011

Table of Contents
List of Illustrations3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY4
1.0.INTRODUCTION5
1.1.Purpose Statement5
1.2Problem5
2.0 DISCUSSION7
2.1 Factors That Contribute To The Problem7
2.2.1 Solutions Proven Most Effective Through Documented Scientific Research8
2.2.2 Solutions Proven Least Effective Through Documented Scientific Research10
2.2.3 Solutions Needing More Research10
2.2.4 Summary Chart of Solution Effectiveness11
3.0 CONCLUSION12
3.1 Conclusion12
3.2 Recommendation12
3.3 Benefits13
References14

List of Illustrations
Figure 1.Summary Chart of Solution Effectiveness14

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Drinking by college students is a widespread and serious problem that has enormous costs to colleges, communities, and the students themselves. Effective reduction of alcohol use will benefit the college and community by reducing associated costs, damages, crimes, injuries, and deaths. Incidents of college age binge drinking and driving while intoxicated (DWI) have increased since 1998. Nationwide statistics from 2001 indicate that: * 1700 alcohol-related unintentional injury deaths among students aged 18-24 * 500,000 students (age 18-24) are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol. * 696,000 students in that age group are assaulted annually by another student who has been drinking. * 2.1 million students (age 18-24) drove under the influence of alcohol * 11% of college student drinkers damaged property while under the influence of alcohol In general, college students who binge drink attach positive expectancies to alcohol use that outweigh the negative consequences associated with excess drinking. Students also viewed alcohol consumption as a rite of passage granted upon entering college (Dodd et al., 2010).

While many different strategies have been used to attempt to reduce the use of alcohol by college age students, utilizing community and environmental approaches as well as intervention on an individual basishas been shown to be most effective.

1.0. INTRODUCTION
1.1. Purpose Statement
The purpose of this proposal is to recommend solutions that have been proven effective through research to combat the problems caused by the excessive use of alcohol by students at Colorado State University. Effective reduction of alcohol use will benefit the college and community by reducing associated costs, damages, crimes, injuries, and deaths. 1.2 Problem

In their paper, What Colleges Need to Know Now: An Update on College Drinking Research (2007), The National Institute in Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s (NIAAA’s) Task Force on College Drinking have reported that incidents of college age binge drinking and driving while intoxicated (DWI) have increased since 1998. Binge drinking is defined as: “A “binge” is a pattern of drinking alcohol that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 gram-percent or above. For a typical adult, this pattern corresponds to consuming 5 or more drinks (male), or 4 or more drinks (female), in about 2 hours.” Binge drinking by college students has numerous negative results for students, the college, and the surrounding community. According to the same research paper, in 2001 there were an estimated 1700 alcohol-related unintentional injury deaths among students aged 18-24, and an additional 500,000 students (age 18-24) are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol. This represents an increase of 6 percent (per college population) since 1998. Also, an estimated 696,000 students in that age group are assaulted annually by another student who has been drinking. More than 97,000 students are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date-rape (“What Colleges Need to Know,” 2007), 400,000 had unprotected sex, and more than 100,000 report having been too...
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