Alcohol Annotated Bibliography

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Alcohol Annotated Bibliography.

This Annotated Bibliography has been developed in co-ordination with an Alcohol Poster presentation, with the aim of elucidating the dangers alcohol has on a person’s health and wellbeing. The author chose alcohol as a topic, as it is well-known to be dangerous but in contrast it is readily available for people to purchase. Alcohol dependency has serious detrimental effects on people’s health and social lives. The World Health Organisation (WHO, 2008) stated “alcohol is the third- biggest threat to public health”. Nearly 200,000 people die each year from alcohol abuse (Claypool). It is an escalating problem within UK culture; latest statistics demonstrate 33% of men and 16% of women were described as “hazardous” drinkers (NHS, 2007) This annotated bibliography includes an alphabetical list of research sources. In addition to bibliographic data, an annotated bibliography provides a concise summary of each source and some assessment of its value or relevance, in order to provide the reader with the best information in regards to the chosen topic, using a general selection criteria, drawing from academic articles, academic texts, books, press and Internet resources highlighting Alcohol and dangers. The source used were easily accessible, providing a variety of information ranging from Government guidelines to professional opinion and research, this will lead to rich and valid data, providing excellent and accurate material regarding Alcohol and the body, with the aim of creating an educational poster. In relation to the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) guidelines confidentiality will be kept.

Bongers, I, Garretsen, H, J Van Oers and L Van de Goor. (1999) Alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, problem drinking, and socioeconomic status, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Vol 34, 78-88. This article is appropriate for the Health Care Professional due to the authors being employed in the Mental Health field as addiction researchers with various professional qualifications, giving the reader trust in the sources cogency and consistency. The layout is simples and easy to understand: bullet points are used along with clear headings to enable the reader to advance knowledge. No diagrams or tables are included, which would have been beneficial as they can then enable the reader to have a better understanding, and awareness of Alcohol. The information has been broken down into manageable sections and the language is appropriate for all readers to gain a general understanding of the problems relating to Alcohol, suitable for nursing practitioners who have an interested in alcohol related addictions. The information provided within the article is not recent (1999), however it does provide an extensive reference list to further research. The information is informative, within the article; it could also be argued that the results section could be more specific to allow for greater consideration. This article was useful in creating my poster, in particular the statistics.

Chick, J. (1993) ‘Brief Interventions for Alcohol Misuse’. British Medical Journal 307, 27, p1374. Jonathan Chick, consultant psychiatrist at Royal Edinburgh Hospital is the author of this investigation regarding interventions for alcohol misuse. Opening with a historical discussion of studies done in regards to alcohol misuse, he notes a deplorable statistic that in Britain 15-30% of men and 8-15% of women have problems with alcohol. He then identifies some brief interventions for alcohol misuse, supported by dependable quotes. This article was written in 1993, it is well written and presented, and however it does look antiquated, in comparison to other journal articles used. It did not include an abstract, which helps the reader to find out if the journal possesses the information they acquire efficiently. This piece of work is aimed at a nursing profession due to the different sources used and the medical...
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