Alcohol and Media Influence

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Every year, children watch an average of 20,000 commercials, with 2000 of them promoting alcoholic beverages. While many view them as harmless, logic would contend that these advertisements play an important role in influencing the attitudes and ideals that society’s youths relate to alcohol consumption. Many aspects of modern media deliver promises that once one engages in “drinking,” the will merge with a high society way of life where popularity, desirability and ultimately happiness are easily attained. While peers and families, environment and heredity, all contribute to one’s inclination to drink, more so, the messages revealed in TV shows, movies, mainstream music and even everyday commercials are constant and consistent in their encouragement of alcohol drinking. Freeman, Cliff. "Stop Liquor Ads on TV: Talking Points." Center for Science in the Public Interest. Feb. 2002. Web. 11 Mar. 2011. <http://www.cspinet.org/booze/liquorads/liquor_talkingpoints.htm>.

One movie in particular, The Hangover, which was released in 2009 and was directed by Todd Phillips reveals how society idolizes and admires the people who are addicted to alcohol and lightens the disheartening effects, connected to its consumption. Once the fame of the movie began rising, it became obvious that the main characters, four adult everyday men, because of their unusual alcohol influenced experiences throughout the film, to a younger generation, they were heroes. Actors, singers, sports figures and celebrities alike are also adored for their practices of excessive drinking, and are easily forgiven when their actions result in troubles, thus reinforcing the idea that there are no consequences for drinking alcohol. For every one alcohol abuse “don’t drink” campaign they see every year, teenagers will see fifty times more advertisements that promotes drinking. While advertisements and commercials are quick to stress the supposed positivity...
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