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A Glossary of Literary Terms
Robert Harris 
Version Date: February 25, 2012
 October 11, 2008 
To find a particular term, use your browser's Find command. Note: Terms already in the Handbook of Rhetorical Devices have been deleted from this file.  Adventure novel. A novel where exciting events are more important than character development and sometimes theme. Adventure novels are sometimes described as "fiction" rather than "literature" in order to distinguish books designed for mere entertainment rather than thematic importance. Examples: * H. Rider Haggard, King Solomon's Mines

* Baroness Orczy, The Scarlet Pimpernel
* Alexandre Dumas, The Three Musketeers
* Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo
Allegory. A figurative work in which a surface narrative carries a secondary, symbolic or metaphorical meaning. In The Faerie Queene, for example, Red Cross Knight is a heroic knight in the literal narrative, but also a figure representing Everyman in the Christian journey.  Many works contain allegories or are allegorical in part, but not many are entirely allegorical. Some examples of allegorical works include * Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene

* John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress
* Dante, The Divine Comedy
* William Golding, Lord of the Flies (allegorical novel) * Herman Melville, Moby Dick (allegorical novel)
* George Orwell, Animal Farm (allegorical novel)
Apologue. A moral fable, usually featuring personified animals or inanimate objects which act like people to allow the author to comment on the human condition. Often, the apologue highlights the irrationality of mankind. The beast fable, and the fables of Aesop are examples. Some critics have called Samuel Johnson's Rasselas an apologue rather than a novel because it is more concerned with moral philosophy than with character or plot. Examples: * George Orwell, Animal Farm

* Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book
Autobiographical novel. A novel based on the...

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