Ailing Earth

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Multiple Uses
Uninterrupted power supply is the foremost need in hospitals. "Energy is becoming a larger proportion of operating cost," observes Hema Hattangady, Vice Chairman & CEO, Conzerv Energy Systems. In a 600-bed hospital, approximately 55 per cent of energy is consumed by Heat Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 10 per cent by lighting, 9 per cent by medical equipment and the rest is used for elevators, laundry, kitchen, autoclave, etc. "Bed occupancy, continuous additions of hi-tech equipment, expansion of hospital, number of procedures, investigations, surgical interventions and length of patient stay are some factors that determine the energy consumption in a hospital," enumerates Sandip Kadam, Chief Engineer, Jehangir Hospital, Pune. With growing demand for energy, high cost, shortage of power, contribution to green house effect and most important of all, quality service to the patients have made energy conservation inevitable in hospitals. Explaining the need for energy management, UK Ananthapadmanabhan, President, Kovai Medical Centre, Coimbatore, says, "Conserving energy using energy efficient equipment, opting for non-conventional sources of energy and recycling resources like water is not only beneficial to hospitals but also a part of corporate social responsibility." Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

S Seshadri Narayanan, Senior Manager, Engineering, Apollo Hospitals, Chennai, sums up energy management as, "Reducing the use of electricity, checking the fuel usage, using renewable source of energy and recycling the resources." For some hospitals, energy management is a part of the engineering department; some hospitals have set up a separate cell for energy management and conservation. They have also formulated a policy for energy management. "The EC cell in our hospital closely monitors and reviews the energy consumption (shift wise/ day wise/ month wise/ year wise)," says Ujjal Majumdar, Chief Engineer, Energy Conservation Project, Batra Hospital & Medical Research Centre, New Delhi. Energy management is carried out in three steps.

* Calculating the energy expenditure.
* Identifying the areas of concern.
* Executing the changes.
Calculating Energy Expenditure
"Anything not measured, cannot be controlled," says Ananthapadmanabhan. An energy audit is carried out to identify and evaluate energy management opportunities. The efficiency and energy consumption of every appliance, medical instruments, and other utilities are measured. The data collected through the energy audit forms the basis for identifying the sectors to implement the changes. Energy audit also helps in calculating the investment needed and time required for the payback. Exclusive firms called Energy Service Companies (ESCo) conduct energy audit, prescribe and carry out the measures on behalf of hospitals or any institution. However, the process is carried out by the hospitals themselves in some cases. "Bed occupancy, hi-tech equipment and surgical interventions are some factors that determine the energy consumption in a hospital" - Sandip Kadam Chief Engineer

Jehangir Hospital
Pune| "Conserving energy is not only
beneficial to hospitals but also becomes part of corporate social responsibility" - UK Ananthapadmanabhan
President
Kovai Medical Centre
Coimbatore|
Identifying Areas of Concern
"We decided to find out and work on areas where energy expenditure can be cut, when the energy cost was shooting up," says Rajiv Goyal, GM, Business Development, Sterling Hospital, Ahmedabad. Once an exhaustive energy audit is performed, the collected data is thoroughly analysed to identify the areas of controlling energy usage, improving efficiency and finding alternate resources. A plan is drawn up for the changes and steps necessary to cut cost. Executing the Changes

Next comes the execution part, where the decided changes are implemented in a phased manner. The changes could be anything from repairing the existing...
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