Aida Theory

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AIDA theory is based on the premise that during a sales presentation, it consists of four stages: Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. The details of these components are as follows:

A: Attention
The salesperson should attract the prospect/customer to his presentation before he actually goes into the details of the same. This is to ensure that the prospect/customer becomes receptive to the presentation. Here the need for securing attention is must. It's a fact that usually the prospect may be busy in his routine jobs or daily assignments. Thus, before meeting the salesperson, the prospect's mind may be engaged in something other than the concerned product, about which the salesperson in going to talk. Unless the salesperson involves the prospect's mind in the presentation, his total effort may go unnoticed or unregistered. Drawing the prospect's attention, therefore, is as good as to detach him from other assignments and involving him in the presentation, both physically and mentally, so as to gain maximum from the sales meeting.

I: Interest
Once the salesperson has successfully gained the prospect's attention, he should maintain the interest of the prospect throughout the presentation. In other words, the salesperson should ensure that the prospect remains glued to his presentation throughout its length and that he does not wander away from the same. The salesperson should be aware of the interest, likes, dislikes, attitude and motivation of the prospect and should proceed with the presentation, keeping in view all the factors. D: Desire

To create a strong desire in the prospect's mind to purchase his product is the next important step. The salesperson should consciously try to bring the prospect into this stage of readiness on the point of buying his product. He should concentrate on projecting the benefits of his product to the prospect. He should go even to the extent of presenting benefits according to the motivation of the prospect. The salesperson should also be prepared to anticipate the resistance to his sales presentation in terms of objections or questions from the prospect. Not only that, he should be prepared with several answers and explanations to the anticipated objections. A: Action

Once the salesperson has been successful in taking his prospect through the three stages, he should induce them into actually buying the product. Sometimes even after going through the three stages of Attention, Interest and Desire; the prospect may still have some doubt or some disinterest which will stop him from taking the final decision of actually buying the product. Hence, it becomes an important task for the salesperson to help his prospect in taking the final decision. At this stage; the salesperson tries to push the prospect into a situation to take a decision; and the deal is closed skillfully and successfully. This is what is expected of a salesperson in this stage. NOTE THAT:

“The components of this theory believe that the salesperson should design his presentation in such a manner which takes care of all these stages of the process of selling.”


Advertising - Advertising is any paid form of non personal presentation and promotion of ideas, goods, or services by an identified sponsor. There are three goals of advertising. These goals are to: Inform, Persuade, and Remind.

The major media types for advertising are:
Newspapers, Television, Direct mail, Radio, Magazines, Internet, Outdoor (billboards, blimps, etc.), Yellow pages, Newsletters, Brochures, and Telephone The traditional conceptual model for creating any advertising or marketing communications message is the AIDA Model: get Attention, hold Interest, arouse Desire, and then obtain Action.

The AIDA Model
John Caples, one of the greatest copywriters of all time, provides us the following principles when it comes to communicating an advertising message: Caples' Principles:
* Get attention
* Hold attention...
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