Against All Odds essay

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Claudrecus Ellis
Professor Marashi
English 109
19 March 2013
Against All Odds
In the poems, “Let America Be America Again” and “Negro” by Langston Hughes, the voice of the narrator appear to be bold and pitiful. The tones of both poems are anger and bitterness from the minority groups in America towards the majority group. The themes of each poem vary in ways but they are also similar pertaining to the way that African Americans do not have equal opportunities in America just like the other minority groups living in America. In “Let America Be America Again”, Langston Hughes illustrates that America is not the land of the free like it is advertised. In “Negro”, Hughes also castigate America but from the point of the view of an African American. The pity and boldness in the voice of the narrator in, “Let America Be America Again” is easily noticed by the reader of the poem. Hughes feel that African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians all deserve the same opportunity to the live the American Dream just like the Caucasian-Americans but instead the minorities always get the “short end of the stick”, even though they put in the same or greater efforts. Lines 23-24 displays Hughes tone of the poem when he says, “And finding only the same old stupid plan/ Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak. Langston Hughes is bitter and angry because he sees the rich getting richer and poor getting poorer because of the way Americas’ society was during the time period the poem was written. In “Let America Be America Again” the theme is that America isn’t free and equal to all because the minorities do not have the opportunities to live the American dream like the Caucasian-Americans. Hughes was brilliant in making a case for all minority groups in American when he said, “I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart, I am the Negro bearing slavery's scars. I am the red man driven from the land, I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek—” in lines 19-23....
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