Aftermath of the Brown V. Board of Education Case

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 228
  • Published : May 10, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Chante Andrews
Professor N. Morgan
Government 2301-P02
3 March 2013

Brown vs Board of Education
Aftermath – Chante Andrews
During the following years after the unanimous result of the trial the black population fought harder for their civil rights after this one victory. A notable event that occurred immediately after the hearing was that May 17, 1954, the day that the court’s decision was made, was named Black Monday by John Bell Williams, a democratic representative from Mississippi. The term signifies that this was the day in history that the blacks won over their oppressors for what was mostly considered the first time. In follow up and opposition white citizens in south created the White Citizens’ Council in order to ensure that black and white schools stayed segregated from each other. The movement’s philosophy was written down and published as a handbook by Thomas Pickens Brady, circuit court judge who led the Mississippi council. This handbook included their desires for the nullification of the NAACP, creation of a forty-ninth state for Negroes, and the abolition of public schools. (loc.gov) In 1955 Autherine Lucy, an African-American woman, enrolled to the University of Alabama and was prohibited from entry due to her race. Though the incident was taken to court and was not passed until the result of the Brown v. Board of Education was publicized. After finally being admitted to the college many students protested against the desegregation and threatened her life; the university soon suspended Lucy, saying that it was for her safety. With Thurgood Marshall as her lawyer they filed a lawsuit against the university but did not win due to claims of slander from Lucy’s part. (americaslibrary.gov) In Nashville, Tennessee a plan was made so that would gradually desegregate the schools a grade-a-year. Once a compromise was made that the black students were allowed to decide between going to a new school or stay in a segregated one the plan was approved...
tracking img