Afam Studies

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Michelle Fleming
AFAM

Ch 18 Questions

1. Explain why and how some of the New Deal programs, like the AAA and the Civilian Conservation Corps, were discriminatory. The New Deal marked an important shift in the American electoral landscape as significant numbers of African Americans gave their votes to Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Democratic Party for the first time, establishing a political loyalty that has endured for roughly seventy years. New Deal recovery and relief programs rapidly became a central element in blacks' endeavors to survive the harsh economic realities of the Depression. One of these programs, the Civilian Conservation Corps, provided more than a quarter of a million young black men with jobs and was consequently another arena in which the black community waged the struggle for greater equality. Although policy prohibited discrimination, blacks and other minorities encountered numerous difficulties in the CCC. In the early years of the program, some camps were integrated. By 1935, however, there was, in the words of CCC director Fechner, a "complete segregation of colored and white enrollees," but "segregation is not discrimination." At its peak, more than 250,000 African Americans were enrolled in nearly 150 all-black CCC company.

2. What was the effect of the Social Security Act on African Americans? How did that program reveal that whites often wanted to keep poor white women and blacks in subservient positions? The Social Security Act excluded those job categories blacks traditionally filled. “Negro Work” such as garbage collection, working in foundries, or domestic service was seen as jobs for blacks; now desperate whites used terror and intimidation of get employers to fire blacks so whites could have those jobs

2. How did African Americans survive the Great Depression? The depression hit African Americans hard. While many African Americans were already living in poverty, white employers felt no reservations about...
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