Advertising Junk Food to Children

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It has been recently reported by the Guardian that billions of pounds are spent every day by the junk food companies on persuading children to consume these companies’ products. Should government allow these companies to advertise their products on the media during the children shows time? Some people agree that these companies should be allowed to do that as it is one way of making profits and this action is completely legal. However, a large proportion of people believe that allowing these companies and firms to advertise their products on the media can lead to many serious consequences as some studies show that children are easily affected by these advertisements.

For many years, it was believed that advertising on television has been the most preferred method of marketing junk food companies’ products to children. Robert A. bell and others (2009) state that unhealthy food advertisement rate increases by 78% during children programmes in comparison with other television shows. This statement could emphasise the fact that children are the main target of these companies’ commercials. Moreover, a study in America found that during Saturday morning, when children are most likely to be watching, one food commercial is shown every eight minutes (Robert A. Bell 2009). These advertisements refer to a large number of brands that are easily available in stores. Nevertheless, the ways of advertising also play a role in this issue as most of these commercial show famous people such as celebrities and football players consuming their goods and this can encourage children to do so. Therefore, children become easily motivated to consume these products as they are not likely to differentiate between advertisements and other television programs and they can not understand that commercials aim to sell a product not to inform or tell about it. In addition, most of the products advertised on television are considered as high-fat and high-sugar foods. (Richard P. Adler, 1980,...
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