Advertisement Critiquing Assignment: Geico, Netflix, Old Spice

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Trey Stewart
1812656
Professor Svetlana Kalnova
Comm 3100 Section 003
9/12/12
Assignment 1: Ad Critique
For some it can be something as infuriating as that phone call from a telemarketer, and yet for most of us they are an annoying interruption to our daily television viewing pleasure. However, regardless of if we love them, hate them, or are indifferent towards them, we are sitting through more television commercial advertisements than ever before. Statistics from last year say that “audiences are watching more twenty-two percent more than five years ago and approximately five percent more from 2010” (Thomas, 2011).[i] The idea behind these television advertisements are to, like everything else, get us to purchase whatever is being sold on the screen. The great marketing television ads keep us entertained from the start to finish, they entice us whole-heartedly to the point where we feel insecure or even unintelligent to not consider buying the product. While this is the staple for what should be done, most of them fall way short of this goal. For all of the wrong reasons, when I really think of poorly marketed television advertisements that are prominent in today’s media products like Geico, Netflix, and Old Spice come to mind. These three products each show inefficient ways in promoting their service and should provide more concrete information to give the consumer a reason to buy their product.

Geico as well known for the little green Gecko, should be associated with the below average execution of its commercial advertising. The evolution of the extremely vague commercial advertising has come a long way. We all probably remember the caveman commercials with the slogan “it’s so easy a caveman could do it”. The new commercial has Eddie Money singing “Two Tickets to Paradise”. This commercial uses the heuristic model of persuasion developed by Shelly Chaiken, working in an attempt to securely lock into the viewers’ mind an image or picture that...
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