Advances in Wildfire Firefighting

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  • Topic: Firefighting, Wildland fire suppression, Wildfire
  • Pages : 3 (765 words )
  • Download(s) : 177
  • Published : December 22, 2012
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Advances in Wildland Firefighting

The term "wildland fire fighting" has been defined by the (1) NFPA as: The activities of fire suppression and property conservation in woodlands, forests, grasslands, brush, prairies, and other such vegetation, or any combination of vegetation, that is involved in a fire situation but is not within buildings or structures. Wildland firefighting has come a long way since (2) 1910 when the invention of the pulaski by Ed Pulaski was considered new technology. The fire community has crossed new frontiers not only in hand tools, but also in transportation, water and retardant delivery, communications and computer usage, and personal protective equipment, to name a few. These advances may have gone unnoticed or seemed incremental, but together have changed wildland fighting tremendously. The technological advances that have been made during history of wildland firefighting are astounding. One of the largest advances being communications; in the early years hand-cranked phones were connected with wires hung in trees. Now cell phone provide hi speed internet and satellite phones let wildland fighter communicate anywhere.

(4) According to USFS the "Remember... Only YOU Can Prevent Forest Fires" is now recognized by 95 percent of adults and 85 percent of children in the United States. Even with the number of visitors to the forest growing over the years, the number of accidental wildfires has been cut in half since the beginning of the advertising campaign. The purpose of lessons learned is to bring together any insights gained during an indents that can be usefully applied to future indents. Lesson learned web sites like (5) www.wildfirelessons.net helps the entire wildland fire community use lessons from the past and present to improve for the future agencies and organizations in the wildland fire community have all whys collected information and learned from the past, but this knowledge was widely scattered and new practices...
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