Adulthood and Aging: Social Processes and Development

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Adulthood and Aging: Social Processes and Development

There was a lot of thinking that went behind choosing this topic to write the article on. Firstly I felt that the thought of social selection begins in early adulthood. Again I felt that the type of persons whom we allow to interact with us tells something about our personality. This article has helped me to realize something about me. Now i feel that i am in a better position to interact with others around me. Now I know that the persons whom we interact with as children are the ones with whom we will always stay in touch with. Also they are the ones that we will grow up confiding and knowing they are trustworthy. Their thoughts are the ones that will be emotionally meaningful to us.

I also agree with the article in the aspect that our siblings are the most important persons in our life. This is because they were there with us all the time. As children when we were most vulnerable. And they will also be with us when we grow old. So these will be the people that we will turn to when we need any kind of emotional help. We should also realize the role that our friends play in our lives. They hold a separate position that cannot be replicated by anyone.

I think that if I was going to be discussing the depth about the social interactions with people that I would use this article. After reading it fully it answered most of my questions and the ones that I had left. I would be able to easily find if I research the information. Not only that the article has a lot of information on the research that was done for this subject and when.

References

American Psychological Assoc.)

Antonucci, T. C., Vandewater, E. A., & Lansford, J. E. (2000). Adulthood and aging: Social processes and development. In A. E. Kazdin (Ed.) , Encyclopedia of psychology, Vol. 1 (pp. 79-85). Washington, DC New York, NY USUS: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10516-023
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