Adulteration in Food Stuff and Its Harmful Effects|

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Chicory, Adulterant, Sudan I
  • Pages : 6 (1561 words )
  • Download(s) : 751
  • Published : January 1, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Adulteration In Food Stuff And Its Harmful Effects|
FOOD ARTICLE| ADULTERANT| HARMFUL EFFECTS|
Bengal Gram dhal & Thoor Dhal| Kesai dhal| lahyrism cancer| Tea| Used tea leaves processed and coloured| Liver Disorder| Coffee Powder| Tamarind seed, date seed powder| Diarrhoea|  | Chicory powder| Stomach disorder, Giddiness and joint pain| Milk| Unhygenic water & Starch| Stomach disorder|

Khoa| Starch & Less Fat content| Less - nutritive value| Wheat and other food grains (Bajra)| Ergot (a fungus containing poisonous substance)| Poisonous| Sugar| Chalk powder| Stomach - Disorder|

Black powder| Papaya Seeds and light berrys| Stomach, liver problems| Mustard powder| Argemone seeds| Epidemic dropsy & Glucoma| Edible oils| Argemone oil| Loss of eyesight, heart diseases, tumour|  | Mineral oil| Damage to liver,carcinogenic effects|

 | Karanja oil| Heart problems, liver damage|
 | Castor oil| Stomach problem|
Asafoetida| Foreign resins galbanum, colophony resin| dysentery| Turmeric powder| Yellow aniline dyes| Carcinogenic|
 | Non-permitted colourants like metanil yellow| Highly Carcinogenic|  | Tapioca starch| Stomach disorder|
Chilli powder| Brick powder, saw dust| Stomach problems|  | Artificial Colours| Cancer|
Sweets, Juices, Jam| Non-permitted coaltar dye, (Metanil Yellow)| Metanil yellow is toxic and carcinogenic| Jaggery| Washing soda, chalkpowder| vomiting, diarrhoea| Pulses (Green peas and dhal)| coaltar dye| stomach pain, ulcer| Suapari| colour and saccharin| cancer|

Honey| Molasses sugar (sugar plus water)| Stomach disorder|  Carbonator water beverages|  Aluminium leaves|  Stomach Disorder|  Cloves|  Cloves from which volatile oil has been extracted|  cheating waste of money|

|
|
 An adulterant is a chemical substance which should not be contained within other substances (e.g. food, beverages, fuels) for legal or other reasons. The addition of adulterants is called adulteration. The word is appropriate only when the additions are unwanted by the recipient. Otherwise the expression would be food additive. Adulterants when used in illicit drugs are called cutting agents, while deliberate addition of toxic adulterants to food or other products for human consumption is known as poisoning. In food and beverages

Examples of adulteration include:
* Mogdad coffee, whose seeds have been used as an adulterant for coffee * Roasted chicory roots, whose seeds have been used similarly, starting during the Napoleonic era in France (and continuing until today as a moderately popular additive for cheaper coffee) * Roasted ground peas, beans, or wheat, which have been used to adulterate roasted chicory * Diethylene glycol, used by some winemakers to fake sweet wines * Oleomargarine or lard, added to butter

* Alum is added to disguise usage of lower-quality flour in expensive flours * Apple jellies, as substitutes for more expensive fruit jellies, with added colorant and sometimes even specks of wood that simulate strawberry seeds * Artificial colorants, often toxic - e.g., copper, zinc, or indigo-based green dyes added to absinthe * Sudan I yellow color, added to chili powder, as well as Sudan II, Sudan III, Sudan IV and Sudan Red G for red color * Water, for diluting milk and beer and hard drinks

* Lactose is used to cut illegal cocaine.
* Low quality black tea, marketed as higher quality tea
* Starch, added to sausages
* Cutting agents, often used to adulterate (or "cut") illicit drugs - for example, shoe polish in hashish or amphetamines in ecstasy * Urea, melamine and other non-protein nitrogen sources, added to protein products in order to inflate crude protein content measurements[1] * Powdered beechnut husk aromatized with cinnamic aldehyde, marketed as powdered cinnamon. * High fructose corn syrup or cane sugar, used to adulterate...
tracking img