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  • Topic: MIT Sloan School of Management, Management, Theory X and theory Y
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Douglas McGregor
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_McGregor
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the professor from MIT. For others named, see Douglas Macgregor (disambiguation). Douglas Murray McGregor (1906 – 1 October 1964) was a Management professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and president of Antioch College from 1948 to 1954.[1] He also taught at the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta. His 1960 book The Human Side of Enterprise had a profound influence on education practices. Contents [hide]

1 Career
2 The Human Side of Enterprise
3 Legacy
4 See also
5 Notes and references
6 External links
[edit]Career

McGregor was born in Detroit. He earned a B.E. (Mechanical) from Rangoon Institute of Technology, an A.B. from Wayne State University in 1932, then earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard University in 1944 and 1955 respectively.[2] [edit]The Human Side of Enterprise

In the book The Human Side of Enterprise, McGregor identified an approach of creating an environment within which employees are motivated via authoritative, direction and control or integration and self-control, which he called theory X and theory Y,[3] respectively. Theory Y is the practical application of Dr. Abraham Maslow's Humanistic School of Psychology, or Third Force psychology, applied to scientific management. He is commonly thought of as being a proponent of Theory Y, but, as Edgar Schein tells in his introduction to McGregor's subsequent, posthumous (1967), book The Professional Manager : "In my own contacts with Doug, I often found him to be discouraged by the degree to which theory Y had become as monolithic a set of principles as those of Theory X, the over-generalization which Doug was fighting....Yet few readers were willing to acknowledge that the content of Doug's book made such a neutral point or that Doug's own presentation of his point of view was that coldly scientific". Graham Cleverley in Managers...
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