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Adolf Hilter Motivation

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Adolf Hilter Motivation

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  • September 2010
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Motivation Evaluation
Adolf Hitler
Gary D. Neer
PSY/230
July 24th, 2010
Amanda Martin

Adolf Hitler
Adolph Hitler was one of the most unlamented tyrants of the twentieth century. His coming to power seemed to have not one single cause but led him to become a moving part in a sequence of events that not only traumatized Germany to its roots but the world.

The rise and fall of Hitler continues to be a mystery—events that intrigues and horrifies all. At his suicidal death in 1945, the world was only beginning to rea [pic]lize the extent of the horror in which Hitler proclaimed. His desire for world domination, nationalism and the purification of the German race drove him to political leadership of one of the most powerful nations in Europe. Still today, Hitler is remembered as a mad ranting of a genocidal maniac; a man who had given in to his evil inclinations to the point that his personality had been severed from his soul, leaving him to speak as an empty vessel on the behalf of an invisible master. Ironically, what motivated Hitler destroyed Hitler.

Hitler’s Psychoanalytic Motivation

Many believed 60 years ago, Hitler rose to power with the intent to rule the world; the world was arriving at end of times. Hitler was possessed by the ultimate evil and hatred of the Anti-Christ; Satan himself.

Even at the age of 17, Hitler friend was deeply shaken by Hitler’s voice. His friend later said, After gazing intensely at his friend for a full minute, he began to speak. Never before and never again have I heard Adolf Hitler speak as he did in the hour as we stood there alone …? It was as if another being spoke out of his body and moved him.

(Flurry, Flurry, & Thompson, 2010)

It seemed after that experience, Hitler no longer thought like a seventeen-year old boy. Hitler saw himself as “the Messiah”! Hitler had a determination with a force over, which he had little control over (McAdams, 2006). His drive for aggression became...