Adjective Phrases

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 195
  • Published : December 26, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Adjective Phrases

Subordinate clauses, like phrases,
can be used in sentences as if they
were single units.
One word:

The barking dog followed us home.

Phrase:

The dog, barking loudly, chased us.

Clause:

The dog, which was barking loudly,
followed us.





An adjective clause is a subordinate
clause that modifies a noun or a
pronoun.
It cannot stand by itself.


We need a dog that can guard.



An adjective clause usually follows the
word that it modifies.




There must be someone who can tell us
more about dogs.

Sometimes an adjective clause may
interrupt the main clause.


The dog that I like best is the Old English
sheepdog.







Adjective clauses are often introduced
by relative pronouns.
A relative pronoun relates a clause to
the word or words that it modifies.
The most common relative pronouns
are who, which, and that.

Relative Pronouns
Who:
Refers to people

People who own dogs may
exhibit them.

Which:
Refers to animals or
things.
That:
Refers to people,
animals, or things

Anyone could enter early
dog shows, which were not
regulated.
The group that regulates
dog shows is the American
Kennel Club.



You can also use the words where and
when to introduce adjective clauses.



This is a kennel where we left our dog.
Friday is the day when we left it.

Identify each relative pronoun and
adjective clause. Which noun or
pronoun does the clause modify?
1.
2.

3.

4.

5.
6.

7.

8.

A purebred dog is one that has parents of the same breed.
The American Kennel Club, which registers purebred dogs, is
known as the AKC.
Those who own purebred dogs often receive pedigree papers
from the club.
A dog that has a pedigree must have ancestors that are
known and registered.
Peggy’s dog looks like a beagle, which is a type of hound. Peggy has a friend who raises pedigreed beagles in order to
show them in dog shows.
The hound...
tracking img