Adhd in Adults

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  • Topic: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Attention, ADHD predominantly inattentive
  • Pages : 13 (3180 words )
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  • Published : January 11, 2013
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ADHD in Adults
If you have exhibited at least twelve of the following behaviors since childhood and if these symptoms are not associated with any other medical or psychiatric condition, consider an evaluation by a team of ADHD professionals: • A sense of underachievement, of not meeting one’s goals (regardless of how much one has actually accomplished). • Difficulty getting organized.

• Chronic procrastination or trouble getting started.
• Many projects going simultaneously; trouble with follow through. • A tendency to say what comes to mind without necessarily considering the timing or appropriateness of the remark. • A frequent search for high stimulation.

• An intolerance of boredom.
• Easy distractibility; trouble focusing attention, tendency to tune out or drift away in the middle of a page or conversation, often coupled with an inability to focus at times. • Often creative, intuitive, highly intelligent

• Trouble in going through established channels and following “proper” procedure. • Impatient; low tolerance of frustration.
• Impulsive, either verbally or in action, as an impulsive spending of money. • Changing plans, enacting new schemes or career plans and the like; hot-tempered. • A tendency to worry needlessly, endlessly; a tendency to scan the horizon looking for something to worry about, alternating with attention to or disregard for actual dangers. • A sense of insecurity.

• Mood swings, especially when disengaged from a person or a project. • Physical or cognitive restlessness.
• A tendency toward addictive behavior.
• Chronic problems with self-esteem.
• Inaccurate self-observation.
• Family history of AD/HD or manic depressive illness or depression or substance abuse or other disorders of impulse control or mood.

Types of ADHD

There are three variations of ADHD, depending on which symptoms are strongest in an individual. These descriptions are taken from the CDC: Predominantly Inattentive Type: It is hard for the individual to organize or finish a task, to pay attention to details, or to follow instructions or conversations. The person is easily distracted or forgets details of daily routines. Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type:The person fidgets and talks a lot. It is hard to sit still for long (e.g., for a meal or while doing homework). Smaller children may run, jump or climb constantly. The individual feels restless and has trouble with impulsivity. Someone who is impulsive may interrupt others a lot, grab things from people, or speak at inappropriate times. It is hard for the person to wait their turn or listen to directions. A person with impulsiveness may have more accidents and injuries than others. Combined Type: Symptoms of the above two types are equally present in the person.

Common Behaviors and Problems of Adult ADHD

The following behaviors and problems may stem directly from ADHD or may be the result of related adjustment difficulties: • Chronic lateness and forgetfulness.
• Anxiety.
• Low self-esteem.
• Employment problems.
• Difficulty controlling anger.
• Impulsiveness.
• Substance abuse or addiction.
• Poor organization skills.
• Procrastination.
• Low frustration tolerance.
• Chronic boredom.
• Difficulty concentrating when reading.
• Mood swings.
• Depression.
• Relationship problems.

List of Symptoms Commonly Associated with Adult ADHD

• Easily distracted by extraneous stimuli or irrelevant thoughts, difficulty remaining focused • Tends to make careless mistakes, fails to give close attention to details • Procrastinates excessively, avoids or has trouble getting started on tasks • Once started on tasks has problems with follow-through, quickly loses focus and is easily sidetracked, trouble sticking with and completing tasks • Difficulty getting things in order when has to do...
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