Act 1 Scene 5 Romeo and Juliet

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We are nearly at the end of the first Act, and at last our two heroes meet and immediately fall deeply in love with each other.

The language used by Shakespeare here eloquently describes the deep passion that they feel for one another, and the audience are well rewarded for their patience in waiting for the two lovers to meet.

Romeo is shown to be an ingenious lover, convincing Juliet to kiss him after only a few sentences. He uses religion in order to persuade Juliet to kiss him. He says that their love can only be described in religious terms, as it is associated with the purity and passion of god-like beings. In doing so, they are flirting with a blasphemous idea in that Romeo sees Juliet as a Saint that should be worshipped, which in Elizabethan times was idolatry and, therefore, blasphemy.

Juliet freely engages in this type of conversation by describing Romeo as the ‘god of her idolatry’, thereby replacing God with Romeo.

However, Shakespeare ensures that the audience is not totally lost in the couple’s lovemaking, by inserting the knowledge that Tybalt has discovered Romeo’s identity. Capulet stops Tybalt taking immediate action, but he has vowed to take the matter further.

The scene between Romeo and Juliet provides an indication of the roles that each will play in the relationship. It is clear that Romeo is the more dominant partner, using great skill to seduce Juliet. She is a young girl and during the first kiss remains motionless. Although she is greatly attracted to Romeo, she allows him to make the first move, but during the second kiss, she is much more aggressive, using her logic to ensure that Romeo kisses her again in order to take back the sin that he has placed on her lips. Juliet during this conversation starts to mature from a timid young girl to a mature woman. She makes an interesting comment, ‘You kiss by th’ book,’ which can be interpreted in two ways. Firstly, it emphasizes Juliet’s naivety, and in many...
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