Acl Tear

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  • Topic: Anterior cruciate ligament, Knee, Cruciate ligament
  • Pages : 2 (739 words )
  • Download(s) : 117
  • Published : February 13, 2013
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Any Given Friday
ACL Tear
On any given Friday night any athlete could be injured. It is not wished upon any athlete but accidents happen. On a particular Friday our 17 year old athlete suffered an anterior cruciate ligament or ACL tear while playing football for his high school. The athlete was trying to make a quick cut and when he planted his left knee the ACL popped. The athlete himself was able to hear the pop it was so loud. Immediately the athlete went to the ground grabbing his knee. He was not able to put weight on left leg. There was a noticeable amount of swelling while he was being carried off the field. The athlete made the trip from the football field to the local sports clinic for an MRI and to consult with the orthopedic surgeon about options and severity. While the athlete was waiting on the MRI results in a couple of days he was told to perform what is known as RICE, or Rest Ice Compression and Elevation. (webmd.com) These combinations can help with inflammation and pain. Once the doctor got the MRI back, he was able to tell that there was a complete tear of the ACL. The doctor was now telling the athlete and his parents their options of surgery or no surgery and probably not playing again and having more issues down the road. Obviously they chose surgery to repair the torn ligament. Once the athlete was complete with surgery the rehabilitation process begins. Most doctors recommend a seven month rehabilitation progression. Each week must be completed before moving on to the next step of rehabilitation. It is really up to the athlete and how serious and how hard he pushes himself, all while trying not to overdo it at the same time. Here is an example of the seven month long rehabilitation progression: Weeks 1-2:

Range of motion exercises can begin immediately after surgery. The initial focus is to regain full extension (the ability to fully straighten) of the knee. In general, flexion (ability to bend) is much easier to regain than...
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