Acl Reconstruction Surgery

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  • Topic: Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, Patella
  • Pages : 9 (2793 words )
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  • Published : February 20, 2012
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

ACL RECONSTRUCTION SURGERY

Table of Contents

Problem Statement3
1.Solid Works Femur & Tibia CADs4
Figure 1: Normal Human Femur Bone Solidworks 3D CAD4
Figure 2: Normal Human Tibia Bone Solidworks 3D CAD4
2. Tendons Natural Insertion to the Bone………………………………………………………………………………5 Figure 3: Natural Position of the ACL in an intact knee………………………………………………………………5
3.ACL Reconstruction Surgical Technique6
What Is The Anterior Cruciate Ligament?6
Understanding The Knee7
Ligaments8
Surgery For ACL Tears9
Preparing For Surgery10
How Is The ACL Repaired?10
4. Optimum Angle to Minimize Stress…………………………………………………………………………………15 Figure 4: ACL Natural Insertion vs. Optimum Surgery Angle…………………………………………………….15 Figure 5: ACL Optimum Angle Front View Solidworks CAD……………………………………………………….16 Figure 6: ACL Optimum Angle Side View Solidworks CAD…………………………………………………………16 Figure 7: Optimum Angle Side View……………………………………………………………………………………………………….17 Figure 8: Optimum Angle Front View…………………………………………………………………………………………………….17

Problem Statement

Find best angle of insertion for ACL reconstruction to minimize stress concentration of the graft and imitate natural location of tendons. 1. CAD of Femur and Tibia with closest anatomical similarity to real human bone (Human Skeleton or Skeleton, typically in *.stl). 2. Find where the tendons have their natural insertion to the bone, which will be considered the optimum location of grafts. 3. Understand the surgical technique for ACL reconstruction. 4. At the end present your conclusion of the optimum angle for the graft to minimize stress concentration of graft and imitate natural location of tendons.

1.
Solid Works Femur & Tibia CADs

Figure 1.1: Normal Human Femur Bone Solidworks 3D CAD

Figure 1.2: Normal Human Tibia Bone Solidworks 3D CAD

2. Tendons Natural Insertion to the bone
The ACL is located at a 55 degrees average from the sagittal plane. It connects from the posterior lateral part of the femur to an anterior medial part of the tibia. It is attached to the depression in front of the intercondyloid eminence of the tibia, being blended with the anterior extremity of the lateral meniscus. An approximate location or the exact displacement would be an optimum location for the surgery positions the grafts that going to hold the replacement tendon (ACL).

Figure 3: Natural Position of the ACL in an intact knee

3. ACL Reconstruction Surgical Technique

What Is The Anterior Cruciate Ligament?
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most important of four strong ligaments connecting the bones of the knee joint. It is often injured. Ligaments are strong, dense structures made of connective tissue that stabilize a joint. They connect bone to bone across the joint.

The function of the ACL is to provide stability to the knee and minimize stress across the knee joint: * It restrains excessive forward movement of the lower leg bone (the tibia) in relation to the thigh bone (the femur). * It limits rotational movements of the knee.

A tear to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) results from overstretching of this ligament within the knee. * It's usually due to a sudden stop and twisting motion of the knee, or a force or "blow" to the front of the knee. * The extent of the tear can be a partial or a complete tear. * Individuals experiencing a tear to the ACL may or may not feel a pop at the time of the injury. * It is often injured together with other structures inside the knee joint. * After the initial injury, the knee may swell and become painful. * Instability or a sensation the knee is "giving out" may be a major complaint following this injury. Often, but not always, depending on a person's activity level, a torn ACL needs to be fixed. Unfortunately a simple repair by suturing the torn ligament together again is not effective. A...
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