Acids and Bases Exercises

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 83
  • Published : September 18, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
18.1.4 – 18.1.6 

CALCULATIONS INVOLVING ACIDS AND BASES 

 
Review of Important formulas 
 
 
pH = ‐ log10[H+]                            [H+]   =  10‐pH         
pKa = ‐ log10 Ka                             Ka   =  10‐pKa   
pOH = ‐ log10[OH‐]                       [OH‐]   =  10‐pOH   
pKb = ‐ log10 Kb                              Kb  =  10‐pKb 

     

 

The ionic product of water = Kw  =  [H+]  x  [OH‐]  =  1.0 x 10‐14 mol2 dm‐6 at 298 K  The expression varies with temperature 
 
pH    +     pOH      =     14 
 
Ka   x    Kb   =   1.0 x 10‐14               pKa   +   pKb    =    14   
 
 

Acids 

The Ka is the acid dissociation constant and is a measure of the strength of an acid or in  other words a measure of the ability of an acid to dissociate into ions   
Complete the table and statements below 
 
 
 
Ka 
pKa 
 
 
1 x 10‐3 
 
 
 
9.4 
 
 
‐5
1 x 10  
 
 
 
 
9.2 
 
• Compared to a weak acid, a strong acid will contain a __________ concentration of  H+ ions, have a __________ Ka, a __________ pKa and according to Bronsted‐Lowry  theory a __________ conjugate base.  



In comparison, a weak acid will contain a lower concentration of __________ ions,  have a small __________, a large pKa and a __________ conjugate base. 

1



When the strength of the acid decreases the Ka __________ and the pKa  __________.  

 
The following generalized equation is often used to show the dissociation of an acid in  water: 
 
 
 
 
 
⇔ 
HA(aq) 
H+(aq) 

A‐(aq) 
 
general 
acid 

 

 

 

 

conjugate 
base 

Ka 

[H+(aq)]  x 
[A‐(aq)] 
 
 
[HA(aq)] 
 
Note: that water is not included as one of the reactants in the equation because it is a pure  liquid and so its concentration cannot be determined.   
1.
Strong Acids 
• A strong acid completely dissociates into ions.  Therefore we make the  approximation (assumption) that the concentration of the acid molecules is equal to  the concentration of the hydrogen ions, because all of the acid molecules are  converted into H+ and A‐ ions.  

• This approximation need to be stated when calculating the pH of a strong acid.   
Example:  
Calculate the pH and hydroxide ion concentration of a strong as with a [H+] = 1 x 10‐2 mol  dm‐3.   
 
Answer: 
Approximation: A strong acid therefore   [HA]  =  [H+]   
 
 
 
 
 
⇔ 
HA(aq) 
H+(aq) 

A‐(aq) 
 
 1 x 10‐2  
 
1 x 10‐2 
 
1 x 10‐2 
 
mol dm‐3 
mol dm‐3 
mol dm‐3 
 
 pH = ‐ log10 [H+]  =  ‐ log10  1 x 10‐2  =  2  (1SF)   
[OH‐] 

1 x 10‐14 

1 x 10‐14 

1 x 10‐12 mol dm‐3   (1SF) 
 
 
[H + ] 
 
1 x 10‐2 
 
 
 
 
2.
Weak Acids 

2





A weak acid does not completely dissociate into ions.  Therefore, at equilibrium  there are very few moles of ions, the solution contains mostly undissociated acid  molecules. 
In calculations involving a weak acid the following approximations are made in order  to simplify the model.  These approximations need to be stated during calculations. 

 
 
Approximations 
1. [H+(aq)]  = [A‐(aq)]  and both have a concentration of  χ mol L‐1  2. that the concentration of [ HA(aq)]  =  [ HA(aq)]  ‐  χ , but because the concentration of  χ is very small we assume it is negligible so [ HA(aq)] = [ HA(aq)]   

 
 
 
 
 
⇔ 
HA(aq) 
H+(aq) 

A‐(aq) 
 
χ 
χ 
  
 
 
 
Ka 

[H+(aq)]  x  [A‐(aq)] 
 
 
[HA(aq)] 
 
 
 
 
χ 
χ 
Ka 


 
 
[HA(aq)] 
 
Example 1 
Find the [H+(aq)] and pH of a 0.0200 mol dm‐3 solution of a weak acid with a Ka = 6.17 x 10‐8  mol dm‐3. 
 
Answer 
 
Approximations 
1. [H+(aq)]  = [A‐(aq)]  =  χ mol dm‐3 
2. [ HA(aq)]  =  [ HA(aq)]  ‐  χ , but because the concentration of χ is very small assume        [ HA(aq)] = [ HA(aq)] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
+

⇔ 
HA(aq) 
H (aq) 

A (aq) 
 
 0.0200 
mol dm‐3 

 

χ 

 

Ka 
 
 
6.17 x 10‐8 

χ 

 

[H+(aq)] 
x  [A‐(aq)] ...
tracking img