Acid Rain - a Contemporary World Problem

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This paper explores how acid rain is produced, what its impact is on the environment, what has been done by government agencies to help the problem, how effective these measures have been, what individuals can do to help reduce this problem, what are the current technologies for reducing emissions and how these technologies can be used to reduce acid rain in the future. It demonstrates that current attempts to reduce emissions from power plants will not have a significant effect on acid rain reduction; and will support the idea that there is not a single solution to the problem of acid rain, but rather a combination of technologies and methods will have to be utilized to have a noticeable effect of the reduction of and repair of environmental destruction caused by acid rain. Table of Contents: Introduction How Acid Rain is Formed Effect of Acid Rain on the Environment How Large is This Problem? What Has Already Been Done to Reduce Emissions? Have These Measures Been Effective? What is the Future of the Acid Rain Issue? How Can an Individual Help? Current Trends in Alternative Power as a Solution to the Problem Summary Works Cited From the paper: "Our modern world has many conveniences. We enjoy hot water, lights, computers, cars, and many other conveniences, which are now an integral part of our society. Many of us cannot imagine life without them. We seldom think about the costs every time we turn on a light. We do not think about the where the electricity is produced and what the effects on the environment might be. We simply turn on the light. As with all good things, there is a cost. One cost of our modern conveniences is acid rain caused by the burning of fossil fuels. The effects of acid rain came into the forefront during the early seventies as its effects began to be noticed on a global level. The impact of the effects of acid rain is considered to be of great concern to some and of little concern to others. No matter which side you are on, we all must agree that energy consumption will continue to increase globally and we must be weary of the effects of energy production and always stay focused on future generations."


Acid rain is one of the most dangerous and widespread forms of pollution. Sometimes called "the unseen plague," acid rain can go undetected in an area for years. Technically, acid rain is rain that has a larger amount of acid in it than what is normal. The acidity of rain in parts of Europe and North America has dramatically increased over the past few decades. It is now common in many places for rain to be ten to seventy times more acid than unpolluted rain. Many living and non-living systems become harmed and damaged as a result of acid rain. This website gives an informational, in-depth look at acid rain--it's causes and effects; and solutions to the acid rain problem.

Acid rain is caused by smoke and gases that are given off by factories and cars that run on fossil fuels. When these fuels are burned to produce energy, the sulfur that is present in the fuel combines with oxygen and becomes sulfur dioxide; some of the nitrogen in the air becomes nitrogen oxide. These pollutants go into the atmosphere, and become acid.

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide are produced especially when coal is burnt for fuel. Burning coal produces electricity, and the more electricity that people use, the more coal is burnt. Of course, nowadays people probably couldn't live without electricity, so coal will continue to be burnt; but electricity and energy are constantly being overused. Think of it this way: every time you turn on a light switch or the television set without really needing to, you're indirectly contributing to the acid rain problem. Automobiles produce nitrogen oxides (which cause acid rain), so every time you don't carpool when you can, you are helping to cause acid rain. So now that we know what causes acid rain, here's a...
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