Accept or Reject

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How to write a letter to accept an invitation to an event:
* As you begin your letter, express your appreciation for the invitation and thank the reader for inviting you. * Tell the person that you accept the invitation.
* Include any other pertinent information, if necessary (for example, if you must arrive late or leave early and want to mention that fact). * Ask any questions you might have, or if desired, confirm details about the date, time, location, travel arrangements, or accommodations pertaining to the social event. * Let the reader know that you look forward to the event. Give your assurance that the event will be a success.

How to write a letter to decline an invitation to an event:
* Express your appreciation for being invited to the event. * If the event was to raise money or show support for a particular organization or group that you support, mention this fact to the reader. * Express your regret for being unable to attend the event. * Indicate why you cannot attend, if desired.

* If appropriate, congratulate the person(s) (for a wedding, graduation, birthday, etc.). Or if the event was a fundraiser and you would still like to send a donation even though you cannot attend, state that you have included a contribution and indicate the amount of the donation you are making. * Express your hope that the event will be a success.

The 5 Golden Rules for Writing Response Letter

1. Express appreciation
A lot companies begin response letters with: “We have received your letter dated” Don’t do this. The fact that you’re responding to the letter is irrefutable proof that you have received the letter.

Instead of wasting words, immediately go into a response designed to restore the other party’s confidence and regain their goodwill. Begin by expressing appreciation for the feedback:

“Thank you for taking the time to write to us…”

“Thank you for your letter. We appreciate for the opportunity given by the company…”

2. Show empathy
Empathy can be a powerful tool used to disarm an angry person and show that you genuinely care about the inconvenience another party has experienced. Not to be confused with sympathy, empathy is Identification with and understanding of another party situation and feelings.

You can express empathy by saying something similar to, “It must have been very frustrating for you have waited 5 days for your order and for that I am sorry.” (example: an unsatisfied customer complaining about a delivery delay of product)

3. Apologize
Make a note of this rule: Never send out a response letter without an apology. An apology does not have to be an admission of fault. For example, you might say, “I’m so sorry for any misunderstanding you have experienced.” or “If I were in your shoes, I’m sure I’d feel just as you do. I’m sorry for the frustration you have experienced.”

4. Respond with a sense of urgency
(This includes both responding immediately and expressing a sense of urgency about regaining goodwill.) To maximize your opportunity to regain goodwill and keep the other party, you’ll want to work with and demonstrate a sense of urgency.

Make it clear that resolving the problem is as important to you as it is to the other party. You can demonstrate a sense of urgency with your words, tone and literally by moving quickly to resolve the problem.

“We will immediately send you a new workbook with black print. We will ship that today.”

”Ms. Boese, I’m eager to restore your confidence in our company and regain your goodwill. As a concrete form of apology, I am also sending you a disk with my PowerPoint presentation.”

5. Give them double for their trouble
(Add a goodwill token like a coupon or a complimentary product) Sometimes in reject response resolution, it is appropriate to add a little something to the recovery to ensure other party goodwill. This can be as simple as a coupon inviting the other to come back and try...
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