Absinthe, the Truth

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Melody Sharpe
Alana Baker
English 111
October, 21 2012
Absinthe, the truth
Absinthe, a well-known drink prohibited in antiquity is an uncommonly misunderstood drink and as the old rhyme goes, “don’t judge a book by its cover.” One must at least rationalize the actual possibility of the truth of this alcoholic beverage. The history of absinthe and current trends are to be considered when foreshadowing to understand what absinthe is today.

Grasping the background information on absinthe is necessary to know what it is today. First created in 1792 by Pierre Ordinaire, the intentions he had for its purpose would now at times be considered laughable (Fever 1). Pierre was a French doctor who used a substance closely related to absinthe as a remedy for his patients. It wasn’t until 1797 when Dr. Ordinaire and his son-in-law, Henri-Louis Travers collaborated that it became a commercial production. Not until the 1850’s did it really become a successful protocol (2). Hence it was launched in France, guess where it was first successful? Yes, in France it was originally nick-named the, “Green Fairy” and became a popular pastime for aristocracy. Absinthe Fever.com tells us, “In France, absinthe quickly caught on as the favorite aristocracy”. But later on in the 1870’s it was finally a common practice for all classes of society. Furthermore, its popularity struck Americans too, leading up to the prohibition of it in 1912 (2). Eventually in 2007 the ban was miraculously lifted when European distillers pressured American officials to conduct real research for it.

Absinthe is chemically conjured liquor that gets most of its oomph from an herb called wormwood. “It is an emerald green alcoholic drink, bitter in taste”, states drinksmixer.com. Some of the herbs that give it its flavor are licorice, anise, hyssop, veronica, angelica, lemon balm and wormwood (Absinthe herbal 1). It has a sort...
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